FTSE 100 on track to meet target for women on boards

first_imgWednesday 13 November 2019 12:01 am The FTSE 250 has seen a stronger increase with women’s representation increasing this year to 27.9 per cent, up from 24.9 per cent in 2018. Chief executive of the review Denise Wilson said: “There are over 900 women now serving on FTSE 350 boards, providing an ever-increasing pool of women with substantial board experience, yet only 25 women have been appointed into the chair role, even fewer as women CEOs.” Lorna Fitzsimons, co-founder of diversity consultancy group The Pipeline, called for the next government to set targets for the number of women on executive committees (excos).  “Based on current rates of progress, it will take until 2090 before we are able to achieve gender parity on excos. This means that businesses are not going to achieve the targets that the government set for them within the one year they have left.  However, a “step change” is still needed to boost the number of women in senior leadership roles at FTSE 350 companies, the Hampton-Alexander Review report said.  Women’s representation in the senior leadership of FTSE 100 companies has increased this year to 28.6 per cent, up from 27 per cent in 2018 whatsapp More From Our Partners Brave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgI blew off Adam Sandler 22 years ago — and it’s my biggest regretnypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.comInside Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis’ not-so-average farmhouse estatenypost.comSidney Crosby, Alex Ovechkin are graying and frayingnypost.comUK teen died on school trip after teachers allegedly refused her pleasnypost.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.com‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.com980-foot skyscraper sways in China, prompting panic and evacuationsnypost.comFeds seized 18 devices from Rudy Giuliani and his employees in April raidnypost.comWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.com Read more: Senior women in finance call for female-led IPOs to triple Read more: Campaigners hail milestone as FTSE boards hire most women in 450 years FTSE 100 on track to meet target for women on boards “We are still a long way from reaching the target for women in senior leadership roles below board level. Unless half of all appointments made this year go to women – our target for 2020 is not going to be met.” Sir Philip Hampton, chair of the review, said: “Whilst this is a key indicator of change at the top, strengthening the number of women in executive positions is critical to achieving long-term gender balance.  The FTSE 100 is likely to meet its 33 per cent target for women on boards by 2020, while the report showed that women hold 29.6 per cent of all FTSE 250 board positions, up from 24.9 per cent last year and only 7.8 per cent in 2011. Unless half of all available roles go to women this year, the FTSE 350 will not achieve the target for women in leadership positions by the end of 2020. Read more: How we proved to the world that a woman’s place is in a FTSE 350 boardroom whatsapp Share If the same rate of progress continues next year, the FTSE 350 will be on track to meet the 33 per cent target by the end of 2020 deadline, the report said. Around 175 companies are still well adrift from the 33 per cent target and there are still 44 companies with all-male executive committees. “Whoever wins the next general election has to set hard targets for the number of women on executive committees alone. If we just focus on this one target we would effect more lasting change which would positively benefit boards, as well as the future pipeline.” Women now hold 32.4 per cent of all FTSE 100 board positions, up from 30.2 per cent last year and up from only 12.5 per cent in 2011. The FTSE 100 is on track to meet a target of 33 per cent for women on boards by 2020, a government-backed report published today showed. James Booth by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeDaily FunnyFemale Athlete Fails You Can’t Look Away FromDaily FunnyNoteableyJulia Robert’s Daughter Turns 16 And Looks Just Like Her MomNoteableyMisterStoryWoman files for divorce after seeing this photoMisterStoryzenherald.comDolly Finally Took Off Her Wig, Fans Gaspedzenherald.comPast Factory4 Sisters Take The Same Picture For 40 Years. Don’t Cry When You See The Last One!Past Factorybonvoyaged.comThese Celebs Are Complete Jerks In Real Life.bonvoyaged.comJournalistateTeacher Wears Dress Everyday, Mom Sets Up CamJournalistateYourDailyLamaHe Used To Be Handsome In 80s Now It’s Hard To Look At HimYourDailyLamaThe Chef PickElisabeth Shue, 57, Sends Fans Wild As She Flaunts Age-Defying FigureThe Chef Pick last_img read more

Premium / Market insight: As Toft joins MSC, will all the crew stay on the ship?

first_img New Premium subscriber REGISTER By Alessandro Pasetti 22/11/2019 Email* Please Login Premium subscriber LOGIN Forgotten your password? Please click here Email* Please either REGISTER or login below to continue << Go backcenter_img One of the side stories related to the shocking appointment of Søren Toft as chief executive officer of MSC is obviously the personal turmoil and drama that many other senior managers at the company he is joining are going through.For one thing, it’s still unclear when Mr Toft will start with his new employer.MSC sources say that the recently distributed global internal circular just mentioned that his onboarding date will be communicated soon and that he will then move, while others … © Denys Yelmanov Reset Password* Subscription required for Premium stories In order to view the entire article please login with a valid subscription below or register an account and subscribe to Premium LOGIN Reset Your Passwordlast_img read more

Dozens of states probe role of drug makers and distributors in the opioid crisis

first_img GET STARTED Dozens of states probe role of drug makers and distributors in the opioid crisis By Ed Silverman Sept. 19, 2017 Reprints A bipartisan group of 41 attorneys general are demanding information and documents from several drug makers and distributors as part of a large-scale probe into the role these companies may have played in the opioid crisis.The move is the latest effort by local and state governments to strike at industry as opioid painkillers continue to be blamed for fueling addiction and crime, and serving as a bridge to a growing heroin trade. Every day, more than 40 Americans die from overdoses of opioid painkillers, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And each year, 2 million people abuse or misuse the drugs. Ed Silverman [email protected] What’s included? What is it? @Pharmalot STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond.center_img Pharmalot Log In | Learn More Tags opioidspharmaceuticalsSTAT+ Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. APStock About the Author Reprints Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTEDlast_img read more

It’s time to get serious about the economics of expanded access

first_img Where is the self-interest for payers? They must first ask a difficult but crucial question: “Does the experimental treatment have a reasonable chance of a positive clinical impact?” After all, in our increasingly value-based world, should valuable health care resources be used with little hope of success? Within the context of expanded access and timeliness such a query sounds harsh relative to critically ill patients — and the issue of denying hope certainly resonates. So, how can this dilemma be resolved? Should a developer build into its expanded access protocol early-stage payer conversations to “pre-approve” reimbursement? If so, at what levels? Can third-party reimbursement go beyond the FDA-mandated limit of direct costs? This question becomes even more interesting if the expanded use patient is getting the experimental drug for a pre-off-label use, meaning that the approved study design is based on an endpoint for a different condition or conditions. Nobody said this was going to be easy.Most important, what about the self-interest of the patient and (more broadly speaking) public health? The answer here is clear. For patients, expanded access is all about hope and the possibility of generating valuable evidence so others can benefit from their experiences. It’s here that we find the convergence of self-interest: more positive and predictive clinical outcomes, better data points for value-based reimbursement, and a broader and earlier understanding of benefit/risk ratios.With all of these opportunities in mind, should we consider that expanded access programs become a “must do” for development programs seeking truncated approval pathways?FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said recently that drug companies have an “obligation to consider expanded access, especially in areas of unmet medical need.” Should payers be thinking the same thing? It’s time for the discussion about expanded access to get serious and, as Mark Twain reminds us, “The secret of getting ahead is getting started.”Peter J. Pitts is president of the Center for Medicine in the Public Interest, a visiting professor at the Paris Descartes University Medical School, and a former FDA associate commissioner. Here come the right-to-try profiteers. The FDA is powerless to stop them As the winds of change blow away the lingering odors of the “right to try” miasma, it’s time to get serious about expanded access 2.0.Last week, more than 500 people from industry, academia, government, and patient advocacy groups convened at the National Press Club in Washington to discuss, debate, and develop what comes next for expanded access, also known as compassionate use. The first voice to be heard was Dr. Janet Woodcock, director of the Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, in a “fireside chat” I had the honor to moderate. Woodcock shared her belief that expanded access programs are only an iterative step towards more regular and robust use of platform trials.Platform trials, which involve simultaneously studying multiple therapies for a single disease, provide an innovative pathway for broader access to experimental rare disease treatments. Platform trials can target a variety of subtypes of a disease and enroll “just about anybody who is willing to enter the trial,” Woodcock noted. Her hope is that drug developers will someday be more willing to pursue master protocols (clinical trials intended to simultaneously evaluate more than one investigational drug or more than one cancer type in an overall trial structure) if there were more successful examples of them. Step right up, ladies and gentlemen of the drug development industry.advertisement Related: Current FDA guidance offers only the ability to recover direct costs such as how much it costs per unit to manufacture the drug — raw materials, labor, and nonreusable supplies and equipment needed to make the quantity of drug required for the patient’s use — or costs to acquire the drug from another manufacturing source plus shipping and handling. In short, drugs offered under an expanded access protocol cannot be priced for profit.advertisement A year after Trump touted ‘right to try,’ patients still aren’t getting treatment Related: Adobe Peter J. Pittscenter_img About the Author Reprints In the wake of the imbroglio over BrainStorm Cell Therapeutics’ considering embracing a right-to-try strategy for expanded access to its experimental ALS compound that included charging a “semi-commercial” price significantly higher than its direct costs, the debate over expanded access reimbursement has come front and center. Insurance doesn’t generally cover treatments that haven’t been approved by regulators. But should it?In a 1991 memo, Bill Gates said this about the company he co-founded: “Microsoft is not about greed. It’s about innovation and fairness.” How can we apply this philosophy to the economics of expanded access?Here’s one way to think about that. In his now-classic book, “The Wealth of Nations,” Adam Smith wrote, “It is not from the benevolence of the butcher, the brewer, or the baker that we expect our dinner, but from their regard to their own self-interest.” If we replace those three worthy 18th-century tradesmen with the 21st-century drug developer, payer, and patient, what might the “The Wealth of Expanded Access” look like?The self-interest of the developer regarding expanded access includes an opportunity for even earlier conversations with formulary committees, an opportunity to recover some development costs, the satisfaction of doing the right thing, and the ability to capture valuable data. Dr. Robert Temple, the deputy center director for clinical science at the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, has said that expanded access protocols can produce data that demonstrate effectiveness in populations outside those studied in registration trials, potentially leading to broader indications. First OpinionIt’s time to get serious about the economics of expanded access By Peter J. Pitts Jan. 30, 2019 Reprints [email protected] But the issue of expanded access also exists in the present tense, and many thorny issues persist. One of the most significant issues is the silent elephant in the room: Who should pay for access to experimental medicines, and how much should they pay? Right to try doesn’t mean right to try for free. Tags pharmaceuticalsresearchlast_img read more

InflaRx shares fall on failure of lead drug to improve debilitating skin disease

first_imgBiotech Log In | Learn More What’s included? Adobe Shares of the German drug maker InflaRx (IFRX) fell sharply Wednesday after its lead drug failed to benefit patients with a debilitating skin disease in a clinical trial.In the Phase 2 clinical trial, InflaRx tested four escalating doses of its injectable antibody drug called IFX-1 against a placebo in 179 patients with hidradenitis suppurativa, a painful skin disease characterized by inflamed hair follicles, mostly found in the armpits and groin. Involvement of the sweat glands within the follicles causes painful, pus-filled boils, nodules, and abscesses. Adam Feuerstein InflaRx shares fall on failure of lead drug to improve debilitating skin disease Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the biotech sector — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Senior Writer, Biotech Adam is STAT’s national biotech columnist, reporting on the intersection of biotech and Wall Street. He’s also a co-host of “The Readout LOUD” podcast. GET STARTEDcenter_img What is it? Tags biotechnologydrug developmentrare disease STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. [email protected] @adamfeuerstein By Adam Feuerstein June 5, 2019 Reprints Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. About the Author Reprintslast_img read more

AMF strengthens compliance guidance

first_img In an effort to enhance industry compliance, the Autorité des marchés financiers (AMF) is publishing new guidance.The AMF issued an updated version of its guidance for firms and reps that fall under the distribution legislation, which includes financial planners and insurance industry reps. FSRA reviews 57 life agent reporting forms Frédéric Pérodeau, superintendent, AMF client services and distribution oversight, said the guide aims to help reduce compliance burdens “by providing guidance on applicable regulatory requirements, predictability, and clarification concerning our expectations.”The guidance aims to explain the regulatory framework in plain language, clarify the AMF’s expectations and to set out good governance and compliance practices.The updated guidance incorporates financial sector reforms that were adopted under Bill 141, including new rules for offering products and services online.As well, the regulator updated its guidance for protecting vulnerable clients. James Langton guidelines and regulations binders kchung/123RF Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Related news Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Keywords Compliance,  Financial planning,  Insurance advisorsCompanies Autorité des marchés financiers Regulators aim to root out pandemic-driven liquidity issues Conflicts, crypto, cyber risk: the year ahead in compliancelast_img read more

Arts sector in Queensland set to RISE

first_imgArts sector in Queensland set to RISE Ten Queensland arts projects will share in over $7 million funding from the first batch of the Morrison Government’s Restart Investment to Sustain and Expand (RISE) Fund.Grants up to $1.5 million will begin to flow immediately, supporting arts and entertainment sector organisations in Queensland that are seeking to restart, re-imagine or create new cultural and creative activities.Minister for Communications, Cyber Safety and the Arts, the Hon Paul Fletcher MP, said the grants were an important step in safeguarding the future of Queensland’s creative and cultural sector.“Cultural and creative organisations are part of Queensland’s identity and soul, which is why we are so pleased to provide over $7 million in funding to 10 projects across the state, to support their long-term sustainability,” Minister Fletcher said.“The arts and entertainment sector makes up a large contingent of the Queensland’s workforce, and our investment will support the creation of nearly 10,000 jobs across the state, with benefits to flow on to the tourism, hospitality, transport and freight sectors.”Brisbane audiences will be the first to experience the Shaun the Sheep’s Circus Show, which will receive more than $1.3 million in support. The live circus production is anticipated to reach more than 120,000 people.One of the largest grant recipients in Queensland is The Queensland Music Trail, which received nearly $1.5 million in funding. The world-first music tourism platform inspires audiences to discover regional and remote Queensland.The $75 million RISE program was announced as part of the Government’s $250 million Creative Economy Support Package to help restart activities such as festivals, concerts, tours and events once it is safe to do so. It is anticipated the Fund will create 44,000 jobs across Australia.The successful Queensland projects are listed below. The full list of batch one recipients will be announced before Christmas at: www.arts.gov.au/covid-19-updateOrganisationProject NameFundingDescriptionQueensland Music FestivalQueensland Music Trail$1,473,643A world-first music tourism platform that incentivises discovery of regional and remote Queensland piloting two initial trails (Outback and South-East Queensland) to drive significant visitation across cities and towns.WoodfordiaBushtime and Woodford Folk Festival$1,463,300A new, fully-programmed arts and cultural camping experience, including immersive and interactive activities designed to entertain, teach and inspire.Circa Contemporary CircusShaun the Sheep’s Circus Show$1,372,509The creation of a live circus production based on the internationally acclaimed TV Show ‘Shaun the Sheep’ to tour around Australia.La Boite TheatreLa Boite Artist Company$959,980The engagement of 12 actors and 10 creatives for a 18-month period, spanning a range of specialties and focus areas including acting, theatre-making, directing, dramaturgy and more.BlakDance AustraliaBlakForm 2.0$600,835A digital showcase platform for emerging and mid-career dance artists. It will assist in the development of new work, provide presentation opportunities and touring, and act as a career accelerator.Sunshine Plantations Promotions UnitBig Pineapple Music Festival – 2021 Re-start$292,000A re-start for the ‘Big Pineapple Music Festival’, in 2021 with a diversified program, including art installations and a youth mentoring program.Dancenorth AustraliaDancenorth Regional Reactivation Program$350,000A two-year offering of regionally focused events, anchored by a partnership with Townsville City Council and the North Australian Festival of the Arts, delivering site-specific performances and associated engagement activities.Chandler Shaw EventsWinton’s Way Out West Fest 2021$150,000Access to creative and cultural experiences for outback Queensland to build community spirit, well-being and cohesion.Greg Huglin Noosa Film AcademyRemote, Rural and Regional Youth Community Digital Cross Art-form Workshops and Community Showcase Events$258,398Community screen and arts cultural development to Queensland’s remote, rural, regional communities; including digital entrepreneurship, online creativity, and visual story telling skills.Brunswick Street Venue at the Fortitude Music HallStrings Attached: In Collaboration with the Brisbane Symphony Orchestra$260,000‘Strings Attached’ is a series of events headlined by a different contemporary artist with song arrangements by the Brisbane Symphony Orchestra. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:accelerator, AusPol, Australia, Australian, Brisbane, communications, community, creativity, Government, infrastructure, Investment, Morrison Government, production, Queensland, regional development, sustainability, Townsville, Townsville City Council, Winton, Woodfordlast_img read more

Surviving children in SR-503 head-on crash showing improvement

first_imgSurviving children in SR-503 head-on crash showing improvementPosted by Chris BrownDate: Wednesday, March 11, 2020in: Newsshare 0 Family ‘overwhelmed’ at outpouring of support from the community BATTLE GROUND — Seven years ago, it was a pregnant Rosa Wilson who felt an outpouring of community support when her husband, Brian, suffered a severe brain injury after falling over 15 feet from a tree on his uncle’s property.Today, it is Brian, a nurse at PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center, leaning on the support of a community that has rallied around his family, after 31-year-old Rosa and the couple’s 5-year-old daughter Juniper died in a tragic head-on crash on SR-503 last Friday in Brush Prairie.A sign outside the Brush Prairie General Store wishes the family of Rosa and Brian Wilson well after Rosa and the couple’s 5-year old daughter were killed last Friday during a head-on crash on nearby SR-503. Photo by Chris BrownA sign outside the Brush Prairie General Store wishes the family of Rosa and Brian Wilson well after Rosa and the couple’s 5-year old daughter were killed last Friday during a head-on crash on nearby SR-503. Photo by Chris BrownCarmelle Hanson, a fellow nurse, has been providing updates through a GoFundMe page set up to support the family. That page has already seen nearly $150,000 in donations to help with medical expenses, funeral costs, and support for Brian who will now be raising two children alone.“There is a huge, jagged, raw, bleeding hole where Rosa and Juniper are supposed to be,” Hanson wrote in a post on the GoFundMe page. “It hurts. It really hurts. There is a lot of disbelief, bewilderment, confusion, and even shaking our fists in anger at God. Why? There isn’t an answer on this side of heaven. So we grieve. But we do not grieve without hope. Rosa and Juniper had the saving knowledge of Jesus Christ in their hearts, and when they left this home, they flew to their eternal home in Heaven. Those of us who knew and loved Rosa and Juniper who also know Jesus as our Lord and Savior, are resting in the comfort that they are safe in the arms of Jesus. Jesus said, ‘I am the way and the truth, and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.’ Rosa and Junie believed that. Life is so precious. And as we have been reminded, it is so very fragile and fleeting. Jesus is the way, the truth, and the life. Believe that. Take comfort in that. Live in the peace of Jesus Christ.”Hanson says the children who survived the crash have shown encouraging signs of improvement.Samantha Joy, the sister of Rosa Wilson, poses with 7-year-old Elliott, who was injured during Friday’s head-on crash along SR-503 in Brush Prairie. Photo courtesy Wilson FamilySamantha Joy, the sister of Rosa Wilson, poses with 7-year-old Elliott, who was injured during Friday’s head-on crash along SR-503 in Brush Prairie. Photo courtesy Wilson FamilySeven-year-old Elliot was moved out of the PICU on Monday night after a brace was removed from his neck. Tuesday, he was able to work with a physical therapist, get out of bed, and ask his aunt Samantha to pick him up some popsicles and cotton candy at the grocery store. A child grief counselor has been helping him to process the thought that his mother died in the crash. Elliott reportedly has no memory of the crash.Three-year-old Iona suffered more serious injuries and was in a medically induced coma until Tuesday. Hanson says the girl remains heavily sedated, though she did reach for her tubing when the sedation was lowered, raising hopes that she has not suffered serious brain damage. She suffered a concussion, as well as other badly broken bones, and has had pressure on her brain.“The plan is for her to go for a MRI of her head and neck tomorrow, after which they hope to remove her neck collar,” Hanson wrote. “The plan is still surgery on Thursday, with the facial surgery first by a plastic surgeon and then an orthopedic surgeon will come set her leg and foot.”In a post on his Facebook page, Brian Wilson said countless people have asked what they could bring him. Instead, he just asked that people share their memories of Rosa and Juniper.“Please this is what I need,” Wilson wrote. “It’s so hard but so good to hear of the beautiful ways they touched you all.”A Facebook photo shows 31-year-old Rosa Wilson with her husband Brian, and their three children, Elliott, Juniper, and Iona. Photo courtesy Wilson FamilyA Facebook photo shows 31-year-old Rosa Wilson with her husband Brian, and their three children, Elliott, Juniper, and Iona. Photo courtesy Wilson FamilyNearly 200 people have responded, sharing memories of overseas trips to Finland and Norway, her love of children, and her joyful embrace of her Christian faith.A separate fundraiser to help bring family from North Carolina to the area has already surpassed its goal.Five-year-old Juniper Wilson was killed last Friday during a head-on crash on SR-503 in Brush Prairie. Photo courtesy Wilson FamilyFive-year-old Juniper Wilson was killed last Friday during a head-on crash on SR-503 in Brush Prairie. Photo courtesy Wilson FamilyCrash investigation continuesWashington State Patrol continues to investigate the collision that killed Wilson, Juniper, and 41-year old Kristie Bayers, also of Battle Ground. Early reports are that Bayers may have been attempting to pass another vehicle in the center median of the highway when she entered the southbound lanes and collided with Wilson’s vehicle.Kristie Bayers, 41, died Friday when her vehicle crossed into oncoming traffic on SR-503 in Brush Prairie. Early reports are the Battle Ground woman may have been trying to pass in the oncoming lane. Photo via FacebookKristie Bayers, 41, died Friday when her vehicle crossed into oncoming traffic on SR-503 in Brush Prairie. Early reports are the Battle Ground woman may have been trying to pass in the oncoming lane. Photo via FacebookThe collision was so severe, the engine of Bayers’ Volkswagen was completely ejected from the vehicle.Washington State Department of Transportation says a concrete barrier scheduled to be installed on SR-503 between 154th Avenue and Main Street in Battle Ground likely would have prevented Friday’s collision. It is the third fatal head-on crash along that stretch of SR-503 since 2015.Plans for the barrier were already in progress before Friday’s crash. AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Battle GroundClark CountyLatestshare 0 Previous : Concrete barrier coming to SR-503 where three died in head on crash Friday Next : Gov. Jay Inslee to ban large gatherings in three Washington countiesAdvertisementThis is placeholder textlast_img read more

WATCH: Clark County TODAY LIVE • Wednesday, October 21, 2020

first_img Posted by John Ley|Wednesday, October 21, 2020 |in : News‘What is the need for transit’ on a replacement Interstate Bridge? Studies show COVID-19 mortality falling as cases rise 72-year-old Hazel Dell man charged with stabbing roommate Businesses could also recover up to $30,000 as part of a program to provide discounts to customers.Read more Posted by ClarkCountyToday.com|Wednesday, October 21, 2020 |in : News72-year-old Hazel Dell man charged with stabbing roommate Posted by John Ley|Wednesday, October 21, 2020 |in : NewsStudies show COVID-19 mortality falling as cases rise ‘What is the need for transit’ on a replacement Interstate Bridge? Area businesses could qualify for up to $30,000 in COVID-19 relief funding Posted by ClarkCountyToday.com|Wednesday, October 21, 2020 |in : BusinessArea businesses could qualify for up to $30,000 in COVID-19 relief funding Transit ridership declines, questioning the need for its inclusion on Interstate Bridge replacement project.Read more AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTags:Clark CountyLatestshare 0 Previous : County reschedules virtual forums on 2019 Community Needs assessment Next : Studies show COVID-19 mortality falling as cases riseAdvertisementThis is placeholder text WATCH: Clark County TODAY LIVE • Wednesday, October 21, 2020Posted by ClarkCountyToday.comDate: Wednesday, October 21, 2020in: Newsshare 0 WATCH: 72-year-old charged in Hazel Dell stabbing ; COVID-19 cases rise, but deaths remain flat ; Over $8 million available for local businesses affected by COVID-19 ; Clark County Council to debate further fireworks restrictions ; Decline in bus ridership raises questions about I-5 Bridge transit need ; Frog Ferry feasibility study completed. Senior citizens getting fewer cases of COVID-19, survival rates increasing.Read more A stabbing Tuesday afternoon in Hazel Dell involved two men, who apparently were roommates.Read more last_img read more

Motor Mouth: Trump’s fuel economy changes could be disaster for Canada

first_imgMotor Mouth: A Trump card for the Big Three?But how will any changes affect Canada?Hoo boy, now there’s a can of worms. Or, as the leader of the free world recently opined, “Nobody knew [insert pretty much any important regulatory process] could be so complicated.” The first thing you should know is that Canada follows American federal emissions standards and has done so for quite some time. The automotive portion of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act 1999 essentially mirrors American mandates.So what happens if those regulations change significantly? Do we, as we’ve always done, meekly follow suit? Or do we get our dander up, prove that we are more environmentally righteous than our cousins to the south and continue with the current regulations?Both choices are fraught with peril. For instance, if Mr. Trudeau were to acquiesce, the auto industry might breathe a sigh of relief, but the opposition parties — not to mention the disaffected Liberal faithful — would surely make his life a living hell. But if we stick to our guns, will our auto plants have to crank out two versions of each model, one to meet American standards and another for our own? And will American plants bother altering their products so they could be sold in our (relatively small) market? And, if they do, at what price increase? As Mark Buzzell, chief executive of Ford of Canada, recently told the Financial Post, the more regulations an automaker has to comply with, the higher its costs will be.The wild card: CalifornicationAdding to the possible chaos is that California has been given special dispensation — because Los Angeles’ smog was so bad in the 1970s — to create its own regulations for what is otherwise a federal mandate. It was granted a waiver that allowed the state to set its own rules, stricter than the EPA’s nationwide standards. In 2013, it was granted another waiver that allows the Golden State to force automakers to sell more Zero Emissions Vehicles than they do in the rest of the states. New York and eight other states have adopted the mandate of the California Air Resources Board (CARB).Technically, however, these waivers still represent a federal “permission” rather than a state right. Already, there’s been talk of new EPA head Pruitt — he who sued the organization he now runs 14 times — trying to revoke those waivers. CARB, now almost as powerful an institution as the EPA, would be sure to resist. If you think that resistance to some of Mr. Trump’s initiatives has been entertaining so far, watch for the fireworks that revoking California’s clean air waivers would unleash. And like all pronouncements from the new American administration, there remains a glaring gap between Mr. Trump’s statements and his government’s actions. (Witness the recent news that Robert Lighthizer, America’s prospective trade secretary, is being urged to get “tough” on Canada despite Mr. Trump’s seeming assurances to Mr. Trudeau that all our part of NAFTA required was a couple of “tweaks.”)In the end, if the current American administration has any brains — I’ll leave that as an open-ended question — what they’ll do is keep the current guidelines pretty much intact while extending enough concessions to automakers that it appears they’ve “done something.” Perhaps the credits that the current rules allow for adding stop/start functions, cylinder deactivation and other known — and relatively cheap — technologies can be expanded. Or there could be an increase in the “bonus” that automakers receive for the electric vehicles they do manage to sell. Maybe, we’ll finally see some of that vaunted ability to negotiate.Nonetheless, a wholesale repeal of the previous president’s mandate is a frightening prospect that could dramatically undermine the automakers’ ability to sell the same cars in all jurisdictions in North America. If this year-long “midterm review” is as ham-handed as the recent introduction of the American Health Care Act, might we actually see different standards invoked for different districts? COMMENTSSHARE YOUR THOUGHTS A load of malarkeyOr not.In claiming that customers are buying less fuel-efficient vehicles as a result of today’s cheap gas, the automakers are implying that the Obama rules might force loyal truck owners into subcompacts and, worse yet, hybrids.But the Obama rules do nothing of the sort. As I detailed in September, what the current rules mandate is that every class of car — designated by their “footprint” or size — must attain certain year-over-year fuel economy improvements. According to the rules, a company like Ford could sell nothing but pickups as long as it improved the F-150’s fuel economy by the mandated 3.5 per cent each and every year. Indeed, according the Union of Concerned Scientists, “if a manufacturer sold nothing but full-size pickups in 2025, its target would not be 54.5 mpg but only 35 mpg in the regulatory test cycle.”In other words, just selling pickups doesn’t actually penalize the automaker. In fact, it might help; while pickups have to increase their fuel economy by that aforementioned 3.5 per cent yearly, passenger cars must improve 5 per cent per annum. In other words, it might actually be easier to hit the targets the more trucks they sell. Indeed, says the UCS, Ford’s aluminum-bodied F-150 already meets the standards for 2020. In the end, while the threat the automakers are implying is that everyone might be forced to drive subcompacts, the real impetus seems to be a desire to spend less research and development dollars.RELATED Created with Raphaël 2.1.2Created with Raphaël 2.1.2 President Donald Trump tours the American Center of Mobility, Wednesday, March 15, 2017, in Ypsilanti Township, Mich. From left are, GM CEO Mary Barra, EPA administrator Scott Pruitt, Trump, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, Ford CEO Mark Fields, and Fiat Chrysler CEO Sergio Marchionne. We encourage all readers to share their views on our articles using Facebook commenting Visit our FAQ page for more information. 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The Rolls-Royce Boat Tail may be the most expensive new car ever Buy It! Princess Diana’s humble little 1981 Ford Escort is up for auction An engagement gift from Prince Charles, the car is being sold by a Princess Di “superfan” Give Donald Trump his props; mercurial he may be, but he is sticking to his campaign promises like no other politician before him.Less than 10 days after the chaotic introduction of his (surprisingly not eponymous) health care bill, America’s newly elected president has signalled that he will be looking into rolling back yet another of Barack Obama’s signature legislations, namely the Corporate Average Fuel Economy regulations that called for the American automotive fleet to average 54.5 miles per gallon — 4.3 litres per 100 kilometres — by 2025.In this quest, Trump is supported by automakers — General Motors, Fiat Chrysler, Ford, Toyota and others — and one very important climate change denier: the newly nominated head of the Environmental Protection Agency, Scott Pruitt. Their assault on future fuel economy standards is two pronged. The latter is on record as not believing that greenhouse gasses cause global warming while the former, hedging their bets, are not saying that conservation is unnecessary, but that Obama’s regulations are so stringent that they will drive the price of news cars higher and stunt the sales of their (highly profitable) trucks and SUVs. They need reprieve! last_img read more