Major win left Stanford wondering: What now?

first_imgThere’s something more than rejuvenating in Angela Stanford’s return to Evian, the mountain-resort community in the shadow of the French Alps. There’s something medicinal. After an emotional breakthrough winning the Evian Championship for her first major championship title last year, Stanford wanted to build on her success. A rib injury late in the year didn’t help her, and those troubles followed her into this season. It hasn’t been the year she hoped it would, but there are terrific memories lifting her up this week. They say there’s curative powers in Evian-les-Bains. More than two centuries ago, the Marquis of Lessert proclaimed the waters at the St. Catherine springs healed him of a kidney and liver ailments. The area has since flourished as a resort and spa community. Stanford learned the restorative nature of the region a year ago, when at age 40 she won the major she feared might never come. “People say majors define careers,” Stanford said Wednesday. “I was at a point where I was OK, personally, without it. That was hard. Took me years to get to that point. “But I just felt like I needed one, as kind of affirmation for myself. I always believed I could win one. When you don’t year after year after year, you do kind of start to wonder.” Your browser does not support iframes. Full-field scores from the Evian Championship It was such an emotional victory because her mother was watching back in Saginaw, Texas, amid a battle with a second bout of cancer. It was also emotional because it was such a long journey to that trophy. When she lost in a U.S. Women’s Open playoff at 25, there was consolation in the feeling she was going to get a lot more chances and that she was good enough to win a major or two. While she went on to win five LPGA titles, the majors would become a string of disappointments. “I was just mad,” she said. “Just mad that I didn’t have one, mad that I was trying and mad that I couldn’t figure it out. “At least now when I show up at majors I’m kind of like, ‘OK, happy to be here.’ “But it’s been challenging, golf-wise, because you just wonder: Is this what drove me for so long? And now, what’s next? Like, OK, it’s easy to say I want to win another one, but do you understand what goes with that? Are you willing to do that at 41?” Stanford doesn’t have a top-20 finish in her 17 starts since winning Evian last fall. She hurt her ribs in Japan late in the year, missed the season-ending CME Group Tour Championship, and then this year missed the season-opening Diamond Resorts Tournament of Champions. When she was finally able to start the year, she missed four cuts in a row early on. “I mean, honestly, it’s been a very bad year,” Stanford said. “I’m at the lowest point I’ve ever been, money-list wise. Greens in regulation are awful. Putting is horrendous. Stat-wise, it’s one of the worst years I’ve ever had.” But . . . “That kind of helps me this week, because my expectations have gone way down. I feel like I’m starting to hit the ball a little bit better. My putting, I feel comfortable on these greens, so that’s helpful.” And there is such a good feeling being at Evian. “Mom is here,” she said. “I have some friends coming. So, I think that’s going to be pretty helpful.” So are all the memories as she plays practice rounds. “It’s just been reminder after reminder,” Stanford said. “For somebody that’s having a tough year, kind of keeps hitting you, ‘OK, something good did happen. Something good can happen.’ So it’s been fun.”last_img read more

Blaney claims HSE “culture of secrecy” clouds OPD discussion

first_imgAudioHomepage BannerNews Blaney claims HSE “culture of secrecy” clouds OPD discussion Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook DL Debate – 24/05/21 Pinterest Twitter Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction Google+ FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 A Donegal Councillor says there is a culture of secrecy in the HSE which means there is no clear timetable for a permanent Out-Patients Department in Letterkenny.The Donegal News is reporting today that the HSE is paying over €197,000 a year to rent the current facility at Scally Place in Letterkenny, which was commissioned in the wake of the flooding which devastated the hospital in July 2013.At the time, the facility was chosen as an emergency measure without going to tender, and it was envisaged it would be a temporary solution.Cllr Liam Blaney says at the very least, he wants to see a timetable for a move to a permanent premises. However, he says there’s no sign of that happening………….Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/lbopd1pm.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.center_img Twitter Facebook WhatsApp Previous articleAudio Update – Aughnacloy footpaths may need a deep cleanNext articleDerry and Strabane allocated £7.54 million under LEADER News Highland Pinterest WhatsApp Google+ Harps come back to win in Waterford By News Highland – August 31, 2018 News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24thlast_img read more

Algae carbon capture pilot launched by Vattenfall in Germany

first_imgLast month, European aerospace giant EADS unveiled what it called the world’s first “hybrid” aircraft to run on algae fuel. Algae carbon capture pilot launched by Vattenfall in Germany Mississippi Power cutting stakes in coal-fired, gas-fired stations to reduce excess MW, emissions Half the funding for the project called green MiSSiON (Microalgae Supported CO2 Sequestration in Organic Chemicals and New Energy) comes from Vattenfall, the other half from state and European Union subsidies. The gas emitted at the Senftenberg brown-coal fired plant is being pumped through a kind of broth using algae cultivated in 12 plastic tanks. “The aim is to find out what kinds of algae work with brown coal dust and then, how economical this kind of CO2 reduction is,” a spokesman for the Vattenfall division, Axel Happe, told AFP. The biomass produced in the process can be used to produce biodiesel, to feed biogas power plants and as a nutritious supplement in fish food, Happe said. 7.23.2010 Optimizing Plant Performance: The April POWERGEN+ series activates today Twitter The EUR2m ($2.6m) trial run, which will continue until October 2011, in the depressed Lausitz mining region is one of several experimental attempts in the sector using algae to slash carbon dioxide output, reports AFP. A project at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2008 found that diverting CO2 through an algae broth could reduce emissions by as much as 85 per cent. Vattenfall is the third biggest electricity provider in Germany. Previous articleAlstom to build Indian 800 MW CCGT plant in EUR450m dealNext articleSiemens: UK must improve port infrastructure to facilitate offshore wind investment chloecox He said it was difficult to quantify the amount of CO2 emissions normally emitted at Senftenberg or estimate how sizeable the reduction could be with the use of algae, which can scrub ten times as much CO2 as land-based plants. But he said the company aimed to publish initial results in late 2011. 23 July 2010 – Swedish utility Vattenfall has launched a pilot project using algae to absorb greenhouse gas emissions from a coal fired power plant in eastern Germany. By chloecox – center_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR For more clean coal articles, click here. EmissionsAir Pollution Control Equipment ServicesCoalClean Coal Technologies Facebook TAGSVattenfall Linkedin Linkedin Twitter Vietnam: scaling back coal-fired plans toward gas, renewables Facebook “The microalgae use climate-killing CO2 to create valuable biomass,” the chairman of Vattenfall Europe Mining and Generation, Hartmuth Zeiss, said in a statement. “Moreover the new technology will bring useful know-how to the Lausitz [region] and increase its importance as a region for energy production.” No posts to displaylast_img read more

Study: Zika could reach 2.6 billion people

first_imgTwo new studies published today present an alarming picture of the potential reach of Zika virus and its complex clinical presentation, while researchers reporting in the latest issue of Eurosurveillance said that Culex mosquitos aren’t likely to transmit the virus.Global at-risk populationsIn a study published in the Lancet Infectious Diseases, researchers from the University of Toronto used modeling to identify the areas around the world most at risk for Zika virus. After considering mosquito activity, air travel data and climate information, the researchers said potentially 2.6 billion people living in low-resource parts of Africa and the Asia-Pacific region could be sickened by Zika virus.”It’s a sobering number that highlights the potential magnitude of Zika virus,” said Kamran Khan, MD, MPH from St. Michael’s Hospital’s Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute in Toronto. “It’s not meant to be alarmist, and it may be the worst-case scenario. But Zika is a global epidemic.”Khan said that according the models used, 1.2 billion people in India, 242 million in China, and 197 million in Indonesia are most threatened by Zika. Khan explained that those countries have four factors that put them at risk: high-frequency travel by people from Zika-endemic areas, Aedes mosquito vectors, a climate that sustains mosquito-borne disease, and low public health resources. Using flight data, weather maps and modeling, and population-density maps, Khan and his colleagues were able to assign risk to these countries.”There’s been a lot of attention paid to the risk of Zika in the Americas, the United States, and even Europe,” said Khan. “But we see now [in Florida] that even countries with good public health infrastructure suffer a strain of available health and human resources with Zika.”Khan said the major caveat of the study was the unaddressed question of whether or not populations in Africa and parts of Asia have immunity to certain strains of Zika virus.”Even though we believe the disease originated in Africa,” said Khan, “We don’t make any assumptions in the study about immunity.”Zika may be clinically confused for dengueIn a related study slated for publication today in the Journal of Clinical Virology, Brazilian researchers suggest that Zika infections may be underestimated and mistakenly reported as infections with other flaviviruses, including dengue.The researchers based their conclusions on observations made at a Brazilian hospital. Between January and August of this year, the Zika Research Network (Rede Zika) conducted molecular blood tests on 800 people with suspected dengue virus at the Hospital de Base, Sao Jose do Rio Preto’s reference hospital.Only half of those cases (400) were dengue, and 100 were Zika virus. The remaining 300 cases were not related to any arboviruses and were most likely influenza. Currently, the World Health Organization suggests that all suspected cases of dengue be treated as such, because the disease can be much more severe than related flaviviruses.Mauricio Lacerda Nogueira, MD, PhD, a member of the Zika Research Network, explained the findings in a press release from Sao Jose do Rio Preto Medical School (FAMERP).”These results suggest the classic division usually made between symptoms—associating conjunctivitis with Zika and joint pain with chikungunya, for example—is only for classroom use. In practice, the symptoms can’t be separated like that,” Nogueira said. “It’s also practically impossible to distinguish between the three arboviruses with the serological tests currently used on a routine basis by laboratories and emergency services.”As of press time the study was not posted on the journal’s Web site.Culex mosquitoes don’t transmit ZikaFinally today’s issue of Eurosurveillance published a study showing that Culex mosquitoes do not transmit Zika virus. The study appears to disprove a hypothesis that Culex mosquitoes, which are widespread in the Americas, were harboring and spreading Zika virus alongside Aedes vectors.Two laboratory colonies of Culex species, Cx quinquefasciatus and Cx pipiens, were successfully fed blood containing Zika virus. While some mosquitoes were infected, neither species could transmit the virus at 21 days post-infection.”On the basis of our results, we consider that vector control should continue to focus on larval and adult habitats specific to Aedes mosquitoes,” the authors concluded.See also:Sep 1 Lancet Infect Dis abstractSep 1 FAMERP press releaseSep 1 Eurosurveill studylast_img read more

New Mexico Commission On Access To Justice Launches ‘Think About This’ Campaign

first_imgCourtesy/NMCAJNMCAJ News:ALBUQUERQUE – The New Mexico Commission on Access to Justice has a message to the public: the lack of legal representation is causing serious injustice and suffering in civil cases.All defendants in criminal cases are guaranteed a lawyer no matter what, but a lawyer is not guaranteed in civil cases and many people suffer serious consequences.“People who can’t afford a lawyer in civil legal cases, or who can’t access legal resources, are losing their homes, losing their children, suffering from lack of benefits, suffering financial hardship because of large medical bills, even becoming homeless – due to a lack of legal representation in civil cases,” said New Mexico Supreme Court Justice Shannon Bacon, who has been a member of the Commission for eight years and presided over thousands of civil cases before being appointed to the New Mexico Supreme Court. “We are here to alert the public to these injustices.”The need is great. The Commission on Access to Justice estimates that only 20 percent of the civil legal cases receive legal representation. Last year, more than 16,000 cases received some form of civil legal assistance, but that means 64,000 cases are not receiving the civil legal assistance needed to ensure justice occurs.The Commission on Access to Justice is working to increase legal resources for essential civil needs such as family law, housing issues, and consumer debt. The Commission has taken several steps to create more civil legal resources for those in need including access to plain-language online forms, self-help centers, legal advice and pro-bono attorneys.“There’s a great injustice going on in our society,” said Liz McGrath, co-chair of the Commission on Access to Justice. “These cases are heartbreaking. Again and again people with serious needs are turned away or don’t even know there’s help.”The New Mexico Supreme Court founded the New Mexico Commission on Access to Justice in 2004 as an independent, statewide body dedicated to expanding and improving civil legal assistance in the state. Judges, attorneys, and legal service providers comprise the 18-member Commission. The commission’s goal is to increase access to justice for those with civil legal needs.The Commission is working to address the barriers that make it difficult to access justice without legal resources.The Commission’s intent for the campaign launched, “THINK ABOUT THIS,” is to alert the public that the problem exists. The campaign asks people to “think about” the serious consequences of the lack of legal representation or resources.“You can’t solve the problem unless people care,” Justice Bacon said.The campaign will include a small amount of TV ads, radio ads and newspaper ads. The campaign will start within the next week.“We’re here today because we want to educate the public that these injustices exist and ask the public to get involved in this critical civil right for all New Mexicans,” McGrath said.last_img read more

‘Lifetime licences’ for sole practitioners

first_imgSole practitioners will no longer have to apply each year for their status to be recognised following a rule change by the Solicitors Regulation Authority. Under the change, which requires approval by the Legal Services Board, sole practitioners will receive ‘lifetime licences’.Sole practitioners make up 28% of the profession in England and Wales, with nearly 3,000 firms. Agnieszka Scott, SRA director of policy, said: ‘By removing this process, it reduces the regulatory burden by saving solicitors and the SRA time.’last_img

Preview: Kluber Looks to Slow Down the Astros for the Indians Tonight at Progressive Field

first_img Matt Loede CLEVELAND – Coming off Thursday night’s lackluster 8-2 loss to the Astros at Progressive Field, the Indians are back at it tonight in game two of the wrap around four-game set at 7:10pm.Corey Kluber will go for the Indians, he won the lone game of the Indians-Astros three-game set last weekend in the Lone Star State, throwing a solid game in an eventual 5-4 win on Saturday.Kluber will go up against Houston ace Dallas Keuchel, who the Indians got to for four runs in the win on Saturday.Here’s a quick look and preview for the Friday night affair in what will be a jam packed Downtown with the Cavs playing for their season next door at Quicken Loans Arena.Time: 7:10 p.m.Starting Pitchers: RHP Corey Kluber (7-2, 2.36) vs. RHP Dallas Keuchel (3-6, 3.43)TV: SportsTime OhioOnline: MLB.TVRadio: WTAM 1100am, Indians Radio Network Pages: 1 2 3 4 Related TopicsAstrosCorey KluberDallas KeuchelIndians Matt Loede has been a part of the Cleveland Sports Media for over 21 years, with experience covering Major League Baseball, National Basketball Association, the National Football League and even high school and college events. He has been a part of the Cleveland Indians coverage since the opening of Jacobs/Progressive Field in 1994, and spent two and a half years covering the team for 92.3 The Fan, and covers them daily for Associated Press Radio. You can follow Matt on Twitter HERE.last_img read more