VIDEO: Twin City lanes reopen after chemical leak contained

first_imgThe road closure due to the chemical spill is now opened for all traffic at the 6300 block of Hwy 347, Officer Pamela Elliott of the Beaumont Police Department reported at about 2:30 p.m. Friday. The Beaumont Fire Department had responded to a chemical leak from a 120- to 150-gallon cylinder on the UPS freight office dock. Motorists were asked to avoid FM 347 near U.S. 69, a Beaumont Fire Department representative said. The chemical is anhydrous chloride, which is a respiratory and skin contact hazard.last_img

HIGH SCHOOL SOCCER ROUNDUP

first_imgDistrict 21-5A BoysBaytown Sterling 4Port Arthur Memorial 0 District 38-4A BoysPort Neches-Groves 1, Beaumont Central 0PNG goal: Angel Valencia assisted by Gerardo Valencia with 24 minutes to playIndians records: 13-7-1, 8-2 Next game: H-Fannett at PN-G, Tuesday at 6 p.m.Nederland 4, Hamshire-Fannett 2Nederland goals: Holden Butler, Grant LopezBulldogs records: 12-4, 9-1Next game: Ozen at Nederland, Tuesday at 7 p.m.District 21-5A GirlsBaytown Sterling 2Port Arthur Memorial 0Lady Titans stars: Amanda Zamora, Dolores Baena, Brenda Pulido, Edith GonzalezLady Titans records: 4-6-2, 0-5Next game: GP No. Shore at PA, Tuesday at 7 p.m.District 38-4APort Neches-Groves 8, Beaumont Central 1Lady Indians goals: Natalie Hager 4, Kelsey Miller 2, Anna Hunter 1, Jenna Morgan 1Lady Indians records: 13-6-1, 10-0Next game: PN-G at H-F, Tuesday at 5:30 p.m.Nederland 5, Hamshire-Fannett 1Lady Bulldogs goals: Taylor Martin 2, Felicia Sauceda 1, Samantha Gaudet 1, Bailey Perryman 1.Lady Bulldogs records: 14-3-1, 8-2Next game: at Bmt Ozen, Tuesday at 5:30 p.m.center_img Titans stars: Carlos Cisneros, Alejandro PulidoTitans records: 2-11-1, 0-4-1Next game: at GP North Shore, Tuesday at 7 p.m.last_img read more

As Venus crosses the sun, a rare treat for skywatchers

first_img Telescopes around the world — and up in space — will turn sunward as the roughly seven-hour transit begins at 6:03 p.m. Eastern time. As the black dollop of Venus inches along, scientists will examine the planet’s atmosphere and gather clues that may help them find Earth-like planets circling other stars.“This is a full-court press,” said Jay Pasachoff, a transit tracker leading an expedition to the Haleakala Observatories high atop Maui in Hawaii. Pasachoff, chairman of the astronomy department at Williams College in Massachusetts, is also coordinating observations across a global network of solar telescopes.In space, NASA’s most advanced sun-spotter, the Solar Dynamics Observatory, will stream the event to computer screens while banking gigabytes of data. “We are going to give the world the best data ever seen from a Venus transit,” said Dean Pesnell of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. A special NASA Web site is preparing for a million viewers. Transits of Venus are so rare because the planet’s orbit is tilted relative to the Earth’s. The two planets line up with the sun only four times every 243 years. (The timing between transits is odd: 121 1/2 years, then eight years, then 105 1/2 years, then eight years again.)Johannes Kepler — that master of orbital mechanics — was the first to puzzle most of this out. In 1627, he predicted a transit would occur in December 1631, and then not again until 1761.The first occurred on schedule, although no one in Europe could watch; the six-hour event happened at night there. Kepler missed it, too; he was dead by then.Several years later, Horrocks was checking Kepler’s figures when he found an error, which revealed that Venus would make another transit in December 1639. Horrocks jumped at the historic opportunity. He set up a telescope — a relatively new invention — and projected a six-inch image of the sun onto paper. His figuring showed that the black spot of Venus should nudge into the bright edge of the sun around 3 p.m.The spot appeared on schedule. Horrocks traced it as it moved, the first record of this heavenly rarity. But it was winter in England and soon the sun set. Venus had moved just a smidge of the way across the sun, William Sheehan and John Westfall recount in their 2004 book “The Transits of Venus.”Horrocks died tragically young, just 22, shortly thereafter.The next set of transits, in 1761 and 1769, triggered scientific drama around the world. European powers sent 100 expeditions to Siberia, the South Pacific, Indonesia, India and other remote locales where the entire transit could be seen.The most famous scientists and explorers of the day chased the event. Telescopes in tow, Captain James Cook sailed his first Pacific expedition, a seven-month voyage to Tahiti, and built an observatory there. All to watch a black dot on the sun for six hours.Before Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon surveyed the Maryland-Pennsylvania border, the Royal Society of England dispatched them to Indonesia for the 1761 transit. They turned around soon after departing when a French ship shelled them and killed 11 crew members. But upon their return to England, the Royal Society threatened the pair with jail if they didn’t chase the transit. So they did, making it to Cape Town, in what is now South Africa, but no farther.This was the big science of the time. And all for a single goal: to figure the size of the solar system. “This was the measurement to make,” said Pesnell.Earlier in the 18th century, English astronomer Edmund Halley — of comet fame — had struck on a way to make this measurement with the transit. It requires viewers stationed as far apart as possible to measure the angle between Venus as it crosses the sun and two points on Earth. From those readings, pages of math would reveal the distance between the Earth and the sun.This measurement requires precise timing, with observers noting to within a second when the dark disk of Venus enters the sun and leaves it.“It’s not a spoiler to say all of the expeditions were unsuccessful” at arriving at a precise figure, said Lawrence Marschall, a professor of physics and astronomy at Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania.The problem: As Venus approached the sun, a smudge, or what some described as a “black drop” appeared on the outer edge of Venus’ disk. This smudge made it difficult to note when Venus had actually entered the sun. Viewers at the same site disagreed by up to a minute.Still, in one of the first examples of international scientific cooperation, Marschall said, the observations were eventually collected and sent to a scientist in Paris who made an estimate of the distance between Earth and the sun that was, all things considered, not far off — about 100 million miles (the actual distance is 93 million miles), much more than the scientists of the time had believed.Space was, indeed, vast.A century later, the transits of 1874 and 1882 saw the United States catch expeditionary fever. Congress allocated $200,000, a princely sum at the time, and tapped Simon Newcomb of the U.S. Naval Observatory to head the venture. Typical for government then as now, Newcomb went way over budget, spending close to $500,000.The public got excited, too, and John Philip Sousa wrote the “Transit of Venus March.” (You can listen to a recording by searching the Library of Congress Web site, www.loc.gov) But soon scientific interest began to wane. Other methods had been developed to measure the solar system. By 1884, it was clear that the major impetus for future expeditions to see the transit would be adventure, and to see something rare.That remains true today, as it was with the last transit, in 2004. Pesnell from NASA is taking a team to Fairbanks, Alaska, where the entire transit will be visible, and various adventure companies are sending tourists to remote Pacific islands.And while the puzzle of the black drop, or smudge, has been solved — it’s an anomaly of telescope optics and the Earth’s atmosphere — other scientific questions remain, said Pasachoff. On Tuesday, sensitive telescopes should glimpse Venus’ outer atmosphere as sunlight passes through it. And measuring how much light Venus blocks will help astronomers calibrate space telescopes now searching distant stars for transiting planets.For the rest of us, the event should inspire awe, Marschall said. “What’s impressive is this sort of clockwork nature of it, the notion that the universe is moving around very precisely and silently and taking no account of us.”A few viewers may even think of Jeremiah Horrocks, who was ecstactic upon seeing the 1639 transit. He wrote, “Contemplate, I repeat, this most extraordinary phenomenon, never in our time to be seen again! The planet Venus, drawn from her seclusion, modestly delineating on the Sun, without disguise . . . .”center_img The annals of European astronomy burst with famous names: Copernicus, Kepler, Halley.Jeremiah Horrocks? Not so famous. But in 1639, the young Englishman became the first person known to witness one of the rarest events in the heavens: the passing of Venus across the face of the sun — a transit.On Tuesday, Venus will again cross the sun, for just the sixth time since. It won’t do so again until 2117, making this the last transit of Venus for nearly everyone alive today.last_img read more

Triangle Calendar

first_imgDiabetes Support Group, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 10, in The Medical Center of Southeast Texas auditorium, 2555 Jimmy Johnson Blvd. in Port Arthur. Topics range from day-to-day living with diabetes to nutrition and new recipes. For more information, call (409) 727-5006.Mid-County Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram Blue Santa Chamber Mixer 5-8 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 10 at the dealership at 8181 Memorial Blvd. Bring a gift.Christmas with the Constable hosted by Constable Chris Bates, 5 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 10 at the Niodra Media Room Banquet Hall, 6551 W. Port Arthur Road. Gumbo and chili will be served, while Constable Bates and local groups provide Christmas songs. Those attending asked to bring one unwrapped toy and five canned goods. All items will be donated to the Salvation Army.Port Arthur Annual Cultural Lighted Holiday Parade is scheduled for Saturday, Dec. 12. Lineup begins at 4:30 p.m. and the parade at 6 p.m.Veterans Helping Veterans will hold an Arts and Crafts Bazaar from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 12, at American Legion Post 943, 922 Nederland Ave. Table rentals available. Contact Denise Robbins, 433-3572.YMCA Southeast Texas CPR/AED, First Aid Classes, 8 a.m. Saturday Dec. 12.  Must Register by Wednesday, Dec. 9. Two-year certification. CPR/AED, Members $35, Non Members $40.  First Aid, Members $55, Non Members $60. Send items at least one week in advance to [email protected] or to Port Arthur News, 2349 Memorial Blvd., Port Arthur, Texas 77640. To view calendar items online, visit www.panews.com/events.Project GLOW will be present its Community Christmas Program  “The Light of the World” at 7 p.m. Dec. 3 at the Bridge City High School. The Charity Christmas presentation is designed to give the youth in our community the opportunity to use their gifts & talents to benefit others who are less fortunate. All proceeds for the Christmas Program will go to the Bridge City/Orangefield Ministerial Alliance. Tickets $5. 466-3600.Jefferson County Health II Department grand re-opening and relocation , 800 Fourth St., Port Arthur, 10 a.m. until 11 a.m. Thursday Dec. 3.The Nederland High School Choir presents “A Candlelight Christmas Concert” at 7 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 3, in the NHS PAC.Hebert Public Library, “Adult Coloring” group meets on Thursday, Dec. 3, 4 p.m., at 2025 Merriman in Port Neches. Seriously, it is officially a “fun” thing: adults with coloring books – really cool coloring books. Beginners welcome.Ribbon cutting at 2:20 p.m. Friday, Dec. 4, for Neighbors Emergency Center, 3300 FM 365 in Port Arthur.Hebert Public Library, Book-a-Librarian session on Friday, Dec. 4, 11 a.m., at 2025 Merriman St. in Port Neches. You have a librarian’s undivided attention for an hour. Need help finding something on the web? Want to create tables in Word? You name it, we will try to assist. Please call Patti at 722-4554 to reserve the hour — and it might help to know in advance what you wish to accomplish.Lighting of the Groves City Christmas Tree and An Old Fashioned Christmas in Groves, 6 to 9 p.m., Friday, Dec. 4. The tree lighting will be held at Celebration Park, 4411 Lincoln Ave. The old fashioned Christmas will be held following the tree lighting along Lincoln Avenue.Nederland Christmas on the Avenue, 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 5. Tree lighting ceremony will begin at 6 p.m. with a visit from Santa and ‘snow’ to follow. Winners of the essay and art contest will be announced. For more information, call the Nederland Recreation Center at 724-0773.Groves Lighted Christmas Parade, 6 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 5. Starts at Cleveland, goes down 39th Street ending at Gulf Avenue.A tamale sale will be Saturday, Dec. 5, at Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish Hall on 61st Street, Port Arthur.  Sponsored by OLG Knights of Columbus Council 12809.  Donation of $10/dozen.  Pre-orders are being taken by phoning: 293-7082, 233-9219, or 718-5955.Port Neches annual Christmas parade 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 5, along Port Neches Ave. and ending at Port Neches Park.Bridge City Chamber of Commerce annual Christmas Light Parade, 6 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 5, on West Roundbunch Road from First Baptist Church to Bridge City Elementary School. For more information, call (409) 735-5671. Bridge City Bank will show the movie “Frozen” on the lawn behind the bank immediately after the parade. Bring a blanket or lawn chairs.Hebert Public Library “Beginning ESL (English as a Second Language)” class on Sunday, Dec. 6, 2-5 p.m. at 2025 Merriman St. in Port Neches. All are welcome. The class meets weekly every Sunday, and students may join at any time. For further information, contact Fernando Ramirez at 409-549-4901.Light! Out of the Darkness, Christmas drama and musical, 6 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 6, First Baptist Church, 1911 Nederland Ave., Nederland. Free admission. For more information contact the church at 722-0263 or visit the website at fbcnederland.com.Port Arthur Little Theatre will hold open auditions for its upcoming production of “Footloose.”  Auditions will be at 7 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 6, and Monday Dec. 7, at PALT, 4701 Jimmy Johnson Blvd.  Roles are available for all ages. There are adult roles and LOTS of high school roles.  The show will run Feb. 19-21, Feb. 26-28, and March 4-6. For more information, call (409) 659-8480.Hebert Public Library, “Learn Chess” class on Monday, Dec. 7, 1 p.m. at 2025 Merriman St. in Port Neches.It’s never too late to learn the most popular game in the world: chess! We will cover the basic rules and piece movements. With that knowledge, patrons are ready to join the “Play Chess” sessions at the library. Open to all ages.Hebert Public Library, “Spanish Conversation” class on Monday, Dec. 7, 11 a.m. at 2025 Merriman St. in Port Neches. Know some Spanish and want to practice speaking with others? Although the class was designed for “graduates” of the library’s recent Beginner Spanish class, our weekly Spanish Conversation get-together is open to anyone.The Department Club of Port Arthur will meet for dessert at 1 p.m., Monday, Dec. 7, at Rose Hill Manor, 100 Woodworth Blvd., Port Arthur.  Reservations are $5 each and should be made with Carolyn Martinez, Symphony Club president, at 722-5109 no later than Thursday, Dec. 3.  Reservations are payable at the door.Light! Out of the Darkness, encore presentation of the Christmas drama and musical, 7 p.m., Monday, Dec. 7, First Baptist Church, 1911 Nederland Ave., Nederland. Free admission. For more information contact the church at 722-0263 or visit the website at fbcnederland.comHebert Public Library, “Play Chess” on Tuesday, Dec. 8, 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. at 2025 Merriman St. in Port Neches. Meet up with other chess fans and play on one of our three tournament-size boards with weighted pieces. Or bring your own chess set. All levels are welcome, but the group will probably skew toward beginners.Hebert Public Library, “Beginner Quilting” class on Tuesday, Dec. 8, 6 p.m. at 2025 Merriman St. in Port Neches. Have access to a sewing machine and want to learn quilting? Join the Hebert Library quilting group. Contact Frances Simpson at [email protected] City Chamber of Commerce monthly networking coffee, 8 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 8, at the Bridge City High School library, 2690 Texas Ave. in Bridge City. For more information, call (409) 735-5671.Nederland Chamber’s Annual Lighted Christmas Parade, 6 p.m. The route is from 21st Street and Nederland Avenue, down 12th Street, left to Boston Avenue and left again down to 17th Street at Central Middle School.Bridge City Chamber of Commerce monthly networking coffee 8 a.m. Tuesday, Dec. 8, Bridge City ISD, Bridge City High School Library, 2690 Texas Ave., Bridge City.Bridge City Chamber of Commerce board of directors meeting, 8 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 10, 150 W. Roundbunch Road in Bridge City. For more information, call (409) 735-5671.Mid-County Chambers’ Christmas Mixer 5:30-7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 9, at the Pompano Club, 330 Twin City Highway, Port Neches. RSVP to 962-3631, 722-0279 or 722-9151 by 5 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 3.YMCA Southeast Texas CPR/AED, First Aid Classes, 8 a.m. Saturday Dec. 12.  Must Register by Wednesday, Dec. 9. Two-year certification. CPR/AED, Members $35, Non Members $40.  First Aid, Members $55, Non Members $60. Grieving Mothers in affiliation with Compassionate Friends will host a candle lighting at 7 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 13, at Doornbos Park on Avenue H in Nederland. Visitation will start at 6:30 p.m. This is a national candle lighting for parents, grandparents, and siblings of a lost child. Attendees are asked to bring their own candle. Those who would like a photograph taken should wear a shirt, etc. with a picture of their child. For more information call Sindy Flores at 409-781-6171.Hebert Public Library, “Audiobooks/ebooks: Apple devices” class, on Tuesday, Dec. 15, 11 a.m., at 2025 Merriman St. in Port Neches. Learn how to check out and download the library’s audiobooks or ebooks to your own Apple device.Bridge City Chamber of Commerce ambassador meeting, 8 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 17, 150 W. Roundbunch Road in Bridge City. For more information, call (409) 735-5671.Bridge City Chamber of Commerce’s annual Taste of the Bayou annual banquet, 6 p.m. Monday, Jan. 11, at Bridge City Elementary School, 1035 Roundbunch Road.Bridge City Chamber of Commerce Networking Coffee – Orangefield ISD, 8 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 12, Cormier Museum – adjacent to Orangefield High School, 99674 FM 105, Orangefield Greater Port Arthur Chamber of Commerce annual banquet, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 21, at the R.A. “Bob” Bowers Civic Center.Bridge City Chamber of Commerce Mystery Dinner, 6 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 6, at Bridge City Community Center, 105 Parkside, Bridge City. Bridge City Chamber of Commerce Networking Coffee, 8 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 9, Neches Federal Credit Union, 410 Texas Ave., Bridge Citylast_img read more

PN man, 63, killed in morning crash on Spur 136

first_imgOn Wednesday December 2nd, 2015 at approximately 7:51am officers were dispatched to a major traffic accident in the 2700 block of Spur 136 in Port Neches. Upon officers arrival it was determined that a 2015 Toyota Tacoma pickup truck was eastbound on Spur 136 and had crossed the center lane and struck a 2006 Ford Tow Truck that was travelling westbound on Spur 136. Port Neches Fire Dept. had to use the “jaws of life” to extricate the driver of The Toyota P.U. He was transported to Christus St. Elizabeth hospital in Beaumont for treatment. The driver of the tow truck was not injured. Witnesses indicated that the Toyota PU was being driven erratically prior to the collision and investigators believe that the driver may have suffered from a medical condition that could have contributed to the accident. Officers were later notified by officials at Christus St. Elizabeth hospital that the driver of the Toyota, 63 year old David Foster Henry of Port Neches, had died at 10:48am. The crash remains under investigation and no charges have been filed.last_img read more

Cards fall in SLC opening round match

first_img The Cardinals end the season with a 9-12 (.429) overall record, but struggled down the stretch dropping five consecutive matches. LU returns the heart of its roster for next season with no seniors on the 2016 roster. Next UpThe Islanders (21-0) picked up wins at Nos. 1 and 3 doubles to score the first point of the match. A&M-Corpus Christi pushed its advantage to 2-0 when Kerry Galhos recorded a 6-1, 6-0 victory over Stephanie Marchena at No. 6 singles.A&M-Corpus Christi took a 3-0 lead after picking up another win at No. 2 singles. Junior Katya Lapayeva dropped the first set, 6-1, but rallied back to make it a close battle in the second. Lapayeva hung tough but fell short dropping the match in straight sets, 6-1, 6-4, to A&M-Corpus Christi’s Jelena Dzinic.The Islanders locked up the victory and advanced to conference semifinals with a straight sets victory on court four. A&M-Corpus Christi’s Celia Rodriguez defeated Talisa Merchiers, 6-4, 6-1, for the overall win. Lamar sports informationNACOGDOCHES – The Lamar women’s tennis team watched its season come to an end in the opening round of the Southland Conference Championship tournament Friday afternoon at the Schlief Tennis Complex.The eighth-seeded Cardinals (9-12) couldn’t find an answer for the regular-season champion Texas A&M-Corpus Christi Islanders, falling 4-0.last_img read more

Triangle calendar

first_imgSend items at least one week in advance to [email protected] or to Port Arthur News, 2349 Memorial Blvd., Port Arthur, Texas 77640. To view calendar items online, visit www.panews.com/events.The Bridge City Chamber of Commerce will hold its monthly networking coffee at 8 a.m. Tuesday, May 10, hosted by FivePoint Credit Union, 715 Texas Ave. Mother of the Year Awards presentation will be made as well as Students of the Month, Employee of the Month and Business of the Month.Captain William Sanders Chapter, NSDAR, will hold their May meeting on Tuesday, May 10, 2016, at 2 p.m. in White Haven, the chapter home, on Lakeshore Drive.Grand Opening/Ribbon Cutting Ceremony with the Groves Chamber of Commerce and the Nederland Chamber of Commerce on Tuesday, May 10, at 3 p.m., for Blues Drive Thru & Carry Out eatery. The business is located at 4000 Main Avenue, Groves. Joseph and Amanda Doiron are the owners.The Mid Jefferson County Retired School Personnel will hold their monthly meeting on Tuesday, May 10, at 1:30 p.m in the Booty Ritter Senior Citizen Center on Boston Avenue in Nederland. Richard Briggs will conduct the installation of 2016-2017 officers and delegates to the state TRTA convention will give a report.  Refreshments will be served and all retired school personnel are encouraged to attend.The Port Arthur Branch of the Salvation Army will hold an open house and a spaghetti dinner fundraiser on Wednesday, May 11, at the Salvation Army facility at 3145 25th St. The open house is from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Boys and Girls Club Center as well as other facilities will be open to the public. The spaghetti dinner will be from 3-6 p.m. The $7 meal includes salad, spaghetti, meat or plain sauce, bread, drink and dessert. For more information, call 983-2229.Diabetes Support Group will meet from 6-8 p.m. Thursday, May 12, in the auditorium at The Medical Center of Southeast Texas, 2555 Jimmy Johnson Blvd. in Port Arthur. Topic: Diabetes increases risk of stroke. Discussion about controlling diabetes for a better quality of life. 727-5006.The Scottish Society of Southeast Texas will meet on Thursday, May 12, in the parlor of St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, 1350 N. 23rd. St. @ Gladys, Beaumont, TX. A covered dish supper will be shared starting at 6:30 p.m. The meeting and program will follow. Marilyn Manson Hayes will present a power point program highlighting the scenic beauty of Scotland,Across the Land by Scottish  Railroad: From Edinburg to Obam. For more information, call John Scott @409-866-4649 or 898-0335The Port Arthur Little Theater presents its season finale, “The Foreigner,” at 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 13, at the PALT Playhouse, 4701 Jimmy Johnson Blvd. Tickets may be purchased online at www.palt.org  or reservations can be made by calling (409) 727-PALT. Tickets are $11 for General Adults, $9 for Seniors/Military/Teachers, and $6 for students. The curtain opens at 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 2:30 p.m. on Sunday.LifeShare Blood drive, 2 to 6 p.m., Saturday, May 14 at Nannie and PawPaw’s Snobiz, 6050 39th St. Free snow cone with donation.The Port Arthur Little Theater presents its season finale, “The Foreigner,” at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 14, at the PALT Playhouse, 4701 Jimmy Johnson Blvd. Tickets may be purchased online at www.palt.org  or reservations can be made by calling (409) 727-PALT. Tickets are $11 for General Adults, $9 for Seniors/Military/Teachers, and $6 for students. The curtain opens at 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 2:30 p.m. on Sunday.Buddy Back Pack Fund Raiser will be held from 7-11 p.m. May 14 at the Knights of Columbus Hall in Groves, 749 Lincoln Ave. Tickets are $10 per person, $5 for gumbo. Music will be by Dickey and the Tornados. For tickets call Bob Ford409-626-2676Jefferson County Singles Club, 7725 Green Ave. in Nederland, will feature Linda Kaye and Kool Karz, 5-9 p.m. Sunday, May 15.Sacred Heart-St. Mary Parish will hold an Evening of Jazz & Fashion featuring Briscoe Lake Jazz Band, fashions of the Golden Triangle and beyond from 4-7 p.m. Sunday, May 15, at Sacred Heart-St. Mary Parish Hall, 911 Abe Lincoln Ave. Donations: $10 adults, $5 ages 6-18. Refreshments will be served immediately after the fashion show. Tickets: 985-5104.The Port Arthur Little Theater presents its season finale, “The Foreigner,” at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, May 15, at the PALT Playhouse, 4701 Jimmy Johnson Blvd. Tickets may be purchased online at www.palt.org  or reservations can be made by calling (409) 727-PALT. Tickets are $11 for General Adults, $9 for Seniors/Military/Teachers, and $6 for students. The curtain opens at 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 2:30 p.m. on Sunday.The Port Arthur Education Foundation Stars Banquet will be 6-8 p.m. Thursday, May 19, at the R.A. “Bob” Bowers Civic Center. Individual tickets $40. Registration deadline May 13. Register at www.portarthurtexas.com or call the Greater Port Arthur Chamber of Commerce at 963-1107.The Greater Port Arthur Chamber of Commerce Morning Business Connection will be from 7:30-9 a.m. Thursday, May 19, at McAlister’s Deli, 8393 Memorial Blvd.The Port Arthur Little Theater presents its season finale, “The Foreigner,” at 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 20, at the PALT Playhouse, 4701 Jimmy Johnson Blvd. Tickets may be purchased online at www.palt.org  or reservations can be made by calling (409) 727-PALT. Tickets are $11 for General Adults, $9 for Seniors/Military/Teachers, and $6 for students. The curtain opens at 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 2:30 p.m. on Sunday.Maritime Day observance to commemorate the loss of the SS Texaco Oklahoma, which broke apart and sank in heavy seas 45 years ago this past March, with 31 seamen losing their lives. A memorial service at 10 a.m. Friday, May 20, at the Seamen’s Memorial Sundial on Procter Street and a luncheon to follow will honor those Port Arthur residents and the other seamen of the Oklahoma. Greater Port Arthur Chamber of Commerce will hold a ribbon cutting for Stripes convenience store and deli at 11 a.m. Friday, May 20, at the store, 3600 Jimmy Johnson Blvd. in Port Arthur. Prizes, giveaways. Sample fresh Mexican Food from Laredo Taco Co.Carol and Mike Hebert benefit 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, May 21, at the Neches River Wheelhouse restaurant, 720 Lee Ave. in Port Neches. Silent auction, live auction, barbecue lunches, live music, 50/50 split the pot, chicken drop, door prizes, dunking booth, face painting, games for kids. Carol Hebert of Port Neches, wife of Port Arthur Police Officer Mike Hebert, is battling breast cancer. Donations may be made to Account No. 59432-1 at Neches Federal Credit Union. Write in memo line, “Mike and Carol Hebert.”The Port Arthur Little Theater presents its season finale, “The Foreigner,” at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 21, at the PALT Playhouse, 4701 Jimmy Johnson Blvd. Tickets may be purchased online at www.palt.org  or reservations can be made by calling (409) 727-PALT. Tickets are $11 for General Adults, $9 for Seniors/Military/Teachers, and $6 for students. The curtain opens at 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 2:30 p.m. on Sunday.Jefferson County Singles Club, 7725 Green Ave. in Nederland, will feature Zydecane, 5-9 p.m. Sunday, May 22.The Port Arthur Little Theater presents its season finale, “The Foreigner,” at 2:30 p.m. Sunday, May 22, at the PALT Playhouse, 4701 Jimmy Johnson Blvd. Tickets may be purchased online at www.palt.org  or reservations can be made by calling (409) 727-PALT. Tickets are $11 for General Adults, $9 for Seniors/Military/Teachers, and $6 for students. The curtain opens at 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 2:30 p.m. on Sunday.Port Neches-Groves High School graduation, 7 p.m. Thursday, May 26, Montagne Center, Beaumont.The Port Arthur Little Theater presents its season finale, “The Foreigner,” at 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 27, at the PALT Playhouse, 4701 Jimmy Johnson Blvd. Tickets may be purchased online at www.palt.org  or reservations can be made by calling (409) 727-PALT. Tickets are $11 for General Adults, $9 for Seniors/Military/Teachers, and $6 for students. The curtain opens at 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 2:30 p.m. on Sunday.Bob Hope High School graduation, 6 p.m., Friday, May 27, 4301 32nd St.The Port Arthur Little Theater presents its season finale, “The Foreigner,” at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 28, at the PALT Playhouse, 4701 Jimmy Johnson Blvd. Tickets may be purchased online at www.palt.org  or reservations can be made by calling (409) 727-PALT. Tickets are $11 for General Adults, $9 for Seniors/Military/Teachers, and $6 for students. The curtain opens at 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 2:30 p.m. on Sunday.Jefferson County Singles Club, 7725 Green Ave. in Nederland, will feature Glenn Lenderman Band, 5-9 p.m. Sunday, May 29.Nederland High School graduation, 7 p.m., Thursday, June 2, Ford Park in Beaumont.Memorial High School graduation, 7 p.m., Thursday, June 2, Montagne Center, Beaumont.The United Way of Mid & South Jefferson County Annual Meeting and Board Installation, June 28, from 4:30-6 p.m. at The Hospitality Center, 3959 Gulfway Drive, Port Arthur.Send items at least one week in advance to [email protected] or to Port Arthur News, 2349 Memorial Blvd., Port Arthur, Texas 77640. To view calendar items online, visit www.panews.com/events.last_img read more

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL: Lamar’s Barrs named player of week for fourth time

first_imgSouthland media relations FRISCO — Lamar’s Chastadie Barrs is the Southland Conference Women’s Basketball Player of the Week for the fourth time this season, league officials announced Monday. All Southland weekly awards are presented by MidSouth Bank.Barrs led her squad to a 77-51 win over UIW Thursday and an 83-72 victory over Sam Houston State Saturday in a perfect 2-0 week for the Cardinals. The senior appeared in every single minute of each game as Lamar played in back-to-back road contests.The LU senior averaged just shy of a double-double going for 19.0 points, 9.5 steals, 8.0 rebounds and 6.5 assists throughout the week. Against the Bearkats, Barrs recorded 12 steals to tie her single-game career-high while improving her to second all-time in Lamar program history with 567 career steals. Her 15 points and 12 steals against Sam Houston State also marked her eighth double-double of the season. The DeSoto product has now recorded a steal in 109 consecutive contests. Barrs also currently leads the NCAA in steals per game (6.2) and steals (111) for the 2018-19 season.Southland weekly award winners are nominated and voted upon by each school’s sports information director. Voting for one’s own athlete is not permitted. To earn honorable mention, a student-athlete must appear on 25 percent of ballots.last_img read more

Movement accelerating: Texas Senate rushes to advance school finance bill

first_imgBy Aliyya SwabyThe Texas Tribunetexastribune.org The vote brings the upper chamber one step closer to catching up with the lower chamber by passing three top legislative priorities: the budget, school finance, and tax reform bills.In a tweet Wednesday morning, Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, the Senate’s president, congratulated the House for passing property tax reform legislation, Senate Bill 2, and said it would go to a conference committee between the two chambers “ASAP.” And he noted that HB 3’s trajectory had been “expedited” so it could get to the Senate floor. (“Also ASAP.”)But some committee members expressed frustration that it was hard to get some constituents on board without reports detailing how each district would be affected.“It’s really difficult for them to feel confident about what this looks like for them,” said Paxton, who declined to take a vote on the bill.Senate Education Committee members voted out a version of the school finance legislation that differs in many ways from the version the House voted out in early April. It includes a $5,000 across-the-board raise for full-time classroom teachers and librarians, funding for districts that want to pay higher-rated teachers more, money for districts with better student academic outcomes, and a few different long-term property tax relief proposals.The House’s version of the bill requires districts to use a portion of their additional base funding per student on raises for all school employees and designates extra money for raises to be given at districts’ discretion. It lowers school tax rates by 4 cents per $100 valuation — $100 off a tax bill for the owner of a $250,000 home — and lowers rates further for districts taxing higher. But it doesn’t include a proposal for long-term, ongoing tax relief.House members made it clear Tuesday they were happy with the property tax bill being yoked to school finance. An attempt to pry them apart during the hours-long floor debate failed by a large margin, with only five lawmakers on record supporting it.In the meantime, another time crunch looms. Taylor has indicated the Senate’s long-term school property tax relief proposals will only be viable if lawmakers also find a sufficient revenue source to make up for lost local tax revenue. Currently, there’s a blank space where the revenue source should be in the bill.State leaders, including Patrick, Gov. Greg Abbott and House Speaker Dennis Bonnen, have backed a proposal to increase the sales tax one percentage point and use that revenue for tax relief.Legislation that would do that, House Joint Resolution 3, was presented in the House Ways and Means Committee last month but has not yet been voted out. It would give Texans the chance to approve the sales tax swap.Time is running out for the House to move that forward. House bills and joint resolutions must get on the lower chamber’s calendar by the end of next Tuesday and must be voted out by the end of next Thursday.The Texas Tribune is a nonpartisan, nonprofit media organization that informs Texans — and engages with them – about public policy, politics, government and statewide issues. Many details of the bill still need to be ironed out, however, and committee members voted Wednesday without an official analysis of how their districts would fare financially. Still, the vote seemed to address concerns that the Senate was moving too slowly on school finance.“I know you’d rather not have to vote on this today. I certainly appreciate your help in moving this forward,” Taylor told the committee in the Senate chamber Wednesday. “This is a process. Frankly, what we pass off the floor on Friday is not the end of the day.”Many committee members expressed disappointment at having to take a vote without being prepared. Their offices received the newest version of the bill just after 8 p.m. Tuesday.With arms folded across his chest, State Sen. Paul Bettencourt, R-Houston, declined to vote for the bill, pointing out that there was no agreed-upon way to fund it long-term and that it still had “clear errors.” He marked himself as “present, not voting,” along with state Sens. Angela Paxton, R-McKinney, and Bob Hall, R-Edgewood.center_img The Senate Education Committee held a hastily arranged hearing Wednesday morning to vote out comprehensive school finance reform legislation — accelerating the bill’s journey to the Senate floor and eventual negotiations with the lower chamber.The fast-tracked revision and vote on House Bill 3 came the day after House lawmakers voted through a property tax reform bill, making it contingent on school finance reform passing this session. State Sen. Larry Taylor, the Senate Education Committee’s chair, had originally told The Texas Tribune on Tuesday he did not anticipate a committee vote on school finance until Thursday or next week.The full Senate is now expected to vote Friday on the legislation, which aims to increase the base funding for each Texas student, increase teacher pay, provide money for full-day pre-K for low-income students, and allow for long-term property tax relief.last_img read more

Isiah (Zeke) Jones

first_img Funeral services will be 11 a.m. Tuesday, July 2, 2019 at Gabriel Funeral Home Chapel with visitation from 9 a.m. until service time.Burial will be on Wednesday, July 3, 2019 at Houston National Cemetery under the direction of Gabriel Funeral Home. Isiah (Zeke) Jones age 83, went home to his heavenly father on Monday June 25, 2019.Mr. Jones was born on August 27, 1935 in Clayton, La to the late Mary Moore and Ike Jones. He graduated from Sevier High School in Ferriday, La.Isiah was veteran of the U. S. Air Force and Active Reserved. He was resident of Port Arthur for over 59 years anda retired Supervisor at Texas Dry Dock. He is preceded in death by his parents Mary Moore and Ike Jones, grandparents who raised him Riley and Elena Moore, paternal grandmother Beatrice Moore, one sisters Rosa Lee Blakes, and one brother Harry Smith.He leaves to cherish his memories, his lovely wife Cleothea Jones, two sons Edward (Crystal) Jones, Curtis (Pamela) Jones, and one daughter Pattie Jones (Charles) all of Port Arthur, two sisters Leola Howard of Baytown, TX, Beatrice Moore of Baton Rouge, La., three brothers Eugene (Isabel) of Houston, TX, Allen (Jackie), Larry Moore both of Baton Rouge, La., six grandchildren, Lance Jones, Chad Jones, Brittnay (Jeremy) Jones, Brad Jones, Rashad Eaglin and Najee Eaglin, four great-grandchildren Landon Jones, Cydney Jones, Gavin Jones and Jordan Jones, a host of nieces, nephews and other relatives.Two special friends Irvin Chapman and Kenny Albert.last_img read more