Lee Kadrich Retires from AAIA

first_imgBETHESDA, Md. – Lee Kadrich, AAP, vice president, government affairs and trade for the Automotive Aftermarket Industry Association (AAIA), has retired after 29 years.   Kadrich served as staff liaison to the AAIA Government Affairs Committee and as executive director of two AAIA membership segments: the Auto International Association (AIA) and the Heavy Duty Distribution Association (HDDA).   Prior to joining AAIA, Kadrich served as vice president of government affairs and trade for the Automotive Parts & Accessories Association (APAA), which he joined in 1981. He also served as legislative assistant for Rep. F. James Sensenbrenner (R-Wis.)   Kadrich is the former chairman of the U.S. Auto Parts Advisory Committee (APAC), where he worked on U.S.-Asian auto parts trade issues. He also served for many years on the industry trade advisory committee (ITAC 2) for automotive equipment and capital goods that advises the Commerce Department and the United States Trade Representative (USTR) on all trade policy matters affecting the industry.   Kadrich received the Auto International Association (AIA) Person of the Year Award in 2006. He also was the recipient of the 2006 Northwood University Automotive Aftermarket Management Education Award.   Kadrich earned a bachelor of arts degree in political science from the University of Wisconsin. He completed the University of the Aftermarket Executive Development Program in April 1999. In November 1999, he earned his Automotive Aftermarket Professional (AAP) designation from the University of the Aftermarket.   AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementlast_img read more

Air Products launches microsite dedicated to food freezing

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Refrade UK first job in Norway

first_imgReftrade UK, a company that sells and leases refrigerated containers and temperature controlled units to the offshore energy sector, has been awarded a contract with a major operator in Norway, ahead of this year’s ONS exhibition.Greg Spence, Reftrade UK managing directorThe contract, which is the first that Reftrade UK has secured in Norway, will see the company supply custom-built refrigeration containers, fitted with Carrier Prime-line duel operation equipment, for use on an offshore platform located in the North Sea.The project will coincide with the company’s first visit to the ONS 2014 exhibition and conference in August, with Norway representing a large growth area for Reftrade UKGreg Spence, Reftrade UK managing director said: “This is a significant contract win for Reftrade UK. Securing a contract with a major operator further underpins our reputation for delivering excellent service and high quality refrigeration containers. “We have experienced a significant increase in demand for our products in the North Sea in recent months which is highly encouraging. The Norwegian market is a key focus for the company as we continue to expand and enhance our range of NORSOK-accredited containers to meet customer demand in the region. “Attending ONS 2014 provides the ideal opportunity for us to meet with new and existing clients to discuss their requirements and explore new business opportunities. The team is looking forward to visiting the well-attended Norwegian exhibition for the first time as we further expand our operations in the region.”The 10ft x 8ft, DNV 2.7-1 containers were custom-built for this project and are of the highest specification we have built to date incorporating Safe Area refrigeration equipment with Zone 2 ATEX internal equipment which also interfaces with the platforms control room. Each of the units are fitted with high end safety specifications, which include Atex Zone 2 easy access butcher doors, man trap alarm, overriding lock systems and a protective outer coating, which ensure they meet full NORSOK and ATEX standards.Reftrade UK is currently looking to appoint a new Norwegian agent. When agreed, the new partnership will aid local operations and provide Reftrade UK with a regional presence for projects in the area.Spence continued: “Forming a new partnership with an already established company based in Norway will be highly beneficial for Reftrade UK. It will provide us with the support and connections we require to offer a full, on-the-ground service to our customer base in the area.”At the end of last 2013, Reftrade UK made a significant investment to improve the safety standards of its rental fleet. The investment saw the company take a market-lead at the time as the only rental supplier of 10ft and 20ft rated explosion proof containers in the UK.Reftrade UK can supply, deliver and advise on the manufacture of custom-built, bespoke units to suit client requirements in a range of different temperatures. The explosion proof containers provide cold or freezer storage in a -28oC to +22oC temperature range. The company’s zoned 1 & 2 units are capable of providing cold or freezer storage, in a -20°C to +6 °C temperature range. [mappress]Press Release, August 18, 2014last_img read more

Siemens: Working with Partner to Address Skills Gaps

first_imgPersonnel professionals have been urged to work with partners to address skills gaps and realise the potential for the offshore wind industry to transform the Humber.That was the message from executives of Siemens, which is creating offshore wind manufacturing and assembly facilities in Hull, and other speakers at the first conference focused on workforce recruitment and training and development issues posed by the region’s burgeoning renewables sector.Mike Jones, Siemens’ UK Human Resources Director for Energy, spelled out the scale of the gaps in engineering and technical skills vital to the offshore wind industry and many other sectors.He said an example was the shortfall in engineering apprentices. There was annual need for 69,000 level 3 engineering apprenticeships in the UK, but the number had actually fallen from 27,000 to 23,500. At level 4, the annual demand for engineers was 87,000, but the supply was just 47,000.He told the Transforming the Humber conference, staged by the Humber branch of the Chartered Institute of Professional Development (CIPD): “The situation is not sustainable. Unless we do something about the skills gaps we’ll have some big issues.“The bottom line is that, if we want to meet the challenges of the next 10 years, we have to double the number of engineers coming through each year.”“Growing our own is a fundamental part of what we do, but only a part. It’s also about working with our partners in the region and across the UK.”He also praised the work of Energy and Utility Skills, an employer-led membership organisation that ensures businesses in these sectors have the skills they need, now and in the future.“We sit around the table with our competitors and also our customers to work on a common skills agenda,” he said. “It’s a great opportunity for employers to join a collaborative effort.”Siemens’ Hull Project Director Finbarr Dowling gave the conference an overview of the investment at Alexandra Dock and said it was an opportunity to drive innovation and reduce costs.He said: “Innovation and investment in places such as Hull will, we believe, enable us to make turbine blades better, faster and of higher quality. That will, ultimately, drive down the cost of electricity from offshore wind.“The industry needs to invest and to improve its quality and productivity and we believe, in Siemens, we can do that exceptionally well here on the Humber.”Other speakers at the conference echoed the importance of partnerships, and stressed the need for the development of a talent “pipeline” through employers engaging with young people from primary age onwards.Image: greenporthulllast_img read more

East End enterprise

first_imgTo continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited accesslast_img read more

Hmmm …

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

Back to nature

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

Fairmount tugs deliver Skarv Idun

first_imgFairmount Sherpa and Fairmount Summit have a combined bollard pull of over 200 tonnes and took just 92 days for the long distance tow of about 15,300 nautical miles from Samsung Heavy Industries’ shipyard in Okpo, South Korea at average speed of 7 knots including stops, via Singapore and the Cape of Good Hope.Skarv Idun is a large floating production storage and offloading unit and will be used by BP to exploit the oil and gas fields Skarv and Idun, located just below the Arctic circle in the northern Norwegian Sea.The FPSO, which is 292 m long, 50.6 m wide, with a towing draught of 12.2 m and a deadweight of 128,000 tonnes, will stay in the port of Stord for final fitting out and last preparations before Fairmount positions and moors Skarv Idun off the Norwegian coast later this month. Production from the fields is foreseen for the third quarter of this year.last_img read more

Fire victims need help

first_imgFires ripped through one house and one shack in Bonteheuwel last week. A house and three wendy houses were damaged in two fires in Bonteheuwel, one of which was caused by children playing with matches.The families are now in need of help to get their lives back on track. The first fire, which occurred on Wednesday November 28, displaced five children and five adults in Prunus Street where three wendy houses burnt down at about 5.30pm. Constance September, whose mother lives in the main house, said when the family returned from the mall they saw the flames. “No one knows what happened; everything burnt to the ground. We have nothing,” she said. Ms September said all of the windows in the front house were also shattered by the heat. Thirty minutes later, a fire ripped through a house in Firethorn Street owned by an elderly couple. The City of Cape Town’s fire and rescue services spokesman, Theo Layne, said this fire had been caused by children playing with matches while the cause of the first fire, which had taken nearly two hours to extinguish, was unknown. He said that in Prunus Street one man had suffered smoke inhalation and was treated by the fire and rescue services but refused transportation to hospital while in the second fire no injuries were reported. Two fire engines, one water tanker and one rescue vehicle with 14 firefighters were dispatched to both incidents separately. Bonteheuwel ward councillor, Angus Mckenzie, said neighbouring residents from Syringa Street had provided the families with food for the evening. “Our appeal is for the people of Bonteheuwel and beyond to assist these five families in which ever way you can. “Donations can directly be dropped with the families or at my office in Kiaat Avenue, Bonteheuwel,” he said. He added that relief and support from the City of Cape Town would be provided for the families.last_img read more

No pain, no gain

first_img Chris Barlow, Bryan & Armstrong, Mansfield I write in relation to the letter from Max Hill QC concerning a unified approach by solicitors and barristers to tackling the threats posed to the criminal justice system by funding reforms and cuts. I agree entirely with his argument, but I am not sure just how it can be achieved. As a clerk working equally with solicitors and barristers, it is obvious to me that even if the Law Society and Criminal Bar Association presented a united front and threatened strike action, they would also need to agree how to deal with those who will inevitably break ranks. The action would need to be sold to members on the basis of ‘a month’s pain for long-term gain’. ‘Gain’ not only for the professions, but also for the public through a properly funded and managed criminal justice system. Once 100% of your members are on board, you then need to sell it to the public. Make no mistake, the popular press will have a field day, citing the ‘greedy lawyers’ line. But I wish you well – though only a humble clerk, I do have a vested interest and, more importantly, so do the public.last_img read more