I want a Hippopotamus for Christmas singer inducted into Oklahoma Music Hall

first_img“I want a Hippopotamus for Christmas” singer inducted into Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame Categories: Entertainment, Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings(KUSI) – The woman behind the 1953 Christmas song “I want a Hippopotamus for Christmas” was recently inducted to the Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame.Gayla Peevey is originally from Oklahoma but now lives in San Diego.Peevey visited Good Morning San Diego to talk about her recent induction and the history behind the famous Christmas Song. KUSI Newsroom Posted: December 10, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, December 10, 2018last_img read more

EC officials for army deployment to ensure fair polls

first_imgElection CommissionField-level officials of the election commission (EC) are in favour of deploying defence personnel as regular law enforcement to create confidence among voters during the next general elections.They came up with these recommendations as their opinion was sought in order to amend 14 laws, rules and directives ahead of the 11th parliamentary polls.Reinsertion of the provision for ‘No’ option in the ballot paper is another of the 58 recommendations the officials submitted to the law section of the EC secretariat.EC officials said the draft recommendations will be placed at the EC’s consultation meetings with the political parties, civil society leaders and election experts likely to begin soon.The armed forces — army, navy, and air force — were included as a law enforcement agency alongside police, armed police, RAB, ansar, BGB (then BDR), and the coast guard, in the amended version of the Representation of People Order during the past caretaker government in 2008. However, in 2013, the armed forces were excluded from the definition of law enforcement agency as per RPO.Inclusion of the armed forces as a law enforcement agency is being emphasised in view of the fact that the election would be held under the incumbent political government. It is believed to be important for creating an even field for all political parties.”Army deployment is necessary to create confidence in the minds of the voters. In fact, it would be hard to hold a fair election without the army. We cannot understand it why it had been removed from the definition of law enforcement,” said former election commissioner M Sakhawat Hossain.The main opposition Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) has all along favoured army deployment while the ruling Awami League wants to keep the army only as striking force.BNP standing committee member Moudud Ahmed reiterated the party’s demand for deployment of the armed forces and added that the BNP wants election-time supportive government for the sake of fair election.AL presidium member, health minister Mohammad Nasim said the army should be deployed during the next general elections the way current election law has defined.However, Jatiya Party leader GM Quader said, if the army deployment creates confidence among the political parties, army should be included as law enforcement in the electoral laws.Although the EC officials recommended reintroduction of the provision for allowing ‘No’ vote as a choice of electorates, both the AL and the BNP do not consider it important.* This report, originally published in Prothom Alo print edition, has been rewritten in English by Khawaza Main Uddin.last_img read more

Quader sees plot to kill Hasina Amu doesnt

first_imgPrime minister Sheikh Hasina. Photo: BSSRuling Awami League general secretary and minister Obaidul Quader has alleged that there is a conspiracy to kill prime minister Sheikh Hasina.However, his cabinet colleague, industries minister Amir Hossain has denied having any evidence of such a plot.After a meeting of the cabinet committee on the law and order on Sunday, Amir Hossain was asked to comment on the reports in India and Myanmar that claimed an attempt on life of Hasina was foiled.The industries minister, who chaired the meeting, said they did not feel that the news item had any element of truth.The government-run news agency BSS ran a story prepared by India-based CNN-News18 that reported that Bangladesh security agencies upset the plot assumed to have hatched by a Pakistani intelligence agency in consultation with BNP chief Khaleda Zia and her son Tarique Rahman. The original report was written by Indian journalist Subir Bhaumik.In Bandarban on Sunday, Obaidul Quader claimed that certain quarters at home and abroad, being jealous of popularity of Hasina, were engaged in conspiracy to kill her.“Their conspiracy will not be successful,” the AL leader expressed confidence.He also said when the prime minster was appreciated worldwide for her stance on the Rohingya issue, a political party at home was criticising her.last_img read more

Dating Among Teammates Civil Rights Versus Group Dynamic

first_img 00:00 /03:04 Share To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Prairie View A&M University AthleticsFormer head women’s basketball coach Dawn BrownA historically black university near Houston, its athletic department and a former coach are grappling with issues relating to ‘dating relationships’ among teammates. This as a women’s basketball head coach was fired in March for violating the rights of two of her players who were dating each other.How should this behavior be managed both on and off the court, in an effort to avoid the courtroom? Is it more important to maintain a good team dynamic, or safeguarding a person’s civil rights?That’s the question regarding a recent incident involving the firing of Prairie View A&M University women’s basketball coach Dawn Brown after she suspended two female players from the team because they were dating.The athletes filed a Title IX complaint, which prevents discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation. Title IX applies to all aspects of education programs or activities receiving federal funding.Prairie View’s Athletic Compliance Director Monique Carroll states, “According to the information that’s published online and in our student athlete handbook, it is the head coach’s responsibility to develop team policies for his or her sport.”And that’s exactly what Coach Brown did. She created the following rule for the team: No player should have non-professional relationships with other players, coaches, managers or any other persons affiliated with the program.According to Brown’s statement, she developed the rule after an assistant coach was fired last August for having an inappropriate relationship with a player.She then collaborated with the school’s Title IX coordinator and athletic director on the rule. Brown claims she received approval.USA Today reports that a university investigation found that the players were removed from the team because of their relationship and that they experienced discrimination over their sexual orientation.“A lot of coaches have made rules like this,” according to Helen Carroll, who’s a former championship basketball coach herself and the sports project director of the National Center for Lesbian Rights.Carroll says Coach Brown may have overreacted in producing her rule based on incidents that happened in August.“The relationship between an assistant coach and a player is completely different than this and should never happen,” says Carroll. “So that’s separate – though I do feel there was an overreaction that Dawn kind of jumped in there and felt like she had to make that rule right away for everybody that had to do with athletics.”Carroll says ‘intra-team dating’ can be allowed, but coaches should have proactive expectations and guidelines in place that foster a good team dynamic.She says those guidelines should apply to all relationship management issues and rules should not be established simply because a player is gay or a lesbian.“If departments don’t want to get mired into this illegal rule of ‘players cannot date each other’ and that’s the only rule that’s made about any relationships,” notes Carroll, “then it’s unfair and it’s discriminatory to do that kind of ‘pin-pointed’ rule on relationships.”Carroll says managing ‘dating’ among teammates is one of the most requested topics for discussion among college coaches, especially with coaches of women’s teams.As more gay men and women come out to staff members and teammates in college, she says it’s important for coaches to communicate guidelines that promote respect for team members of all sexual orientations.Coach Brown’s agent, Garry Rosenfield, says his client plans to appeal her termination but they’re waiting for Prairie View to submit its findings from the investigation.The two former players suspended from the team remain in school and on scholarship.Brown finished with a 41-51 record in three seasons at Prairie View. She led the university to the 2014 SWAC Tournament Championship and NCAA Women’s Basketball Division I Tournament. The Lady Panthers finished the 2015-16 season 13-15 overall and 9-9 in SWAC divisional play. Listen X last_img read more

Houston Short Film Depicts PTSD Firsthand

first_imgCommand FilmsA scene from the short film, A Soldier’s Judgment, which was shot in Houston. Share To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: 00:00 /10:05center_img A new short film shot in Houston aims to depict what many military veterans experience as they deal with PTSD.A Soldier’s Judgment has a pretty simple plot: an Army veteran is sitting in a bar having a few drinks. He tells some of his stories to the bartender, who’s a veteran too.Throughout the 20-minute film, we see some glimpses of what the soldier sees as he reflects – and some of it’s disturbing.Darren Tompkins, the film’s writer and producer, is himself a 13-year Army vet, and he says the basic idea stemmed from a pretty common conversation many veterans will often have with each other about where they served.The film’s director, David Black, says he hopes the story illustrates what many veterans have had to deal with psychologically throughout history.“We’re asking these soldiers to go and sacrifice little pieces of themselves for the sake of their mission,” he said. “And I think that it’s important that we remember that.”Michael HagertyDarren Tompkins and David Black of the Houston short film, A Soldier’s Judgment.A Soldier’s Judgment will be screened at the Austin Indie Fest on Saturday, Nov. 10, as a part of a series of films about veterans.In the audio above, Tompkins and Black tell Houston Matters producer Michael Hagerty about the film.– / 3 X Listenlast_img read more

Making vessels leaky on demand could aid drug delivery

first_imgAddThis http://news.rice.edu/files/2017/05/0515_MAGNETIC-1-WEB-2jd1wm4.jpgFluorescent iron-oxide nanoparticles glow in endothelial cells in an experiment at Rice University. At left, the nanoparticles are evenly distributed among the microtubules that help give the cells their shape. At right, after a magnetic field is applied, the nanoparticles are pulled toward one end of the cells and change their shapes. The researchers believe this offers a way to make the endothelial barrier “leaky” enough to allow drug molecules to pass through to reach tissues. (Credit: Laboratory of Biomolecular Engineering and Nanomedicine/Rice University) http://news.rice.edu/files/2017/05/0515_MAGNETIC-5-WEB-20y74h4.jpgScientists are using magnets and nanoparticles to open “leaks” in blood vessels on demand. The technique could help in the delivery of drugs to targeted areas in the body, including deep tissues and organs. From left, Rice researchers Linlin Zhang, Gang Bao and Sheng Tong. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,879 undergraduates and 2,861 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice is ranked No. 1 for happiest students and for lots of race/class interaction by the Princeton Review. Rice is also rated as a best value among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go to http://tinyurl.com/RiceUniversityoverview. Fluorescent iron-oxide nanoparticles glow in endothelial cells in an experiment at Rice University. At left, the nanoparticles are evenly distributed among the microtubules that help give the cells their shape. At right, after a magnetic field is applied, the nanoparticles are pulled toward one end of the cells and change their shapes. The researchers believe this offers a way to make the endothelial barrier “leaky” enough to allow drug molecules to pass through to reach tissues. Rice researchers prepare nanoparticles between 16 and 33 nanometers in diameter to target endothelial cells. Once inside the cells, they can be manipulated with magnets to open gaps in endothelial cell-cell junctions and allow for controlled drug delivery. http://news.rice.edu/files/2017/05/0515_MAGNETIC-2-WEB-28oo87y.jpgUnder the influence of a magnet, nanoparticles realign actin filaments in endothelial cells. Rice University researchers suspect such realignment can disrupt the junctions between endothelial cells and increase vascular permeability. (Credit: Laboratory of Biomolecular Engineering and Nanomedicine/Rice University) Return to article. Long DescriptionUnder the influence of a magnet, nanoparticles realign actin filaments in endothelial cells. Rice University researchers suspect such realignment can disrupt the junctions between endothelial cells and increase vascular permeability. Courtesy of the Laboratory of Biomolecular Engineering and NanomedicineBlood vessels in cancerous tumors typically have holes in the endothelial barrier, but they don’t close on demand like Bao and his team hope to make them do.Along with drug molecules, Bao wants to use magnets to deliver nanoparticle-infused stem cells to injured tissues. “Unless you can do direct injection of stem cells, let’s say into the heart, you have to do systemic delivery and you have no control over where they go.“Our initial idea was to deliver magnetic nanoparticles into stem cells and then use a magnet to attract the stem cells to a particular location,” he said. “In doing so, we also discovered that by applying a magnetic field, we could generate changes in the cell’s skeletal structure in terms of the actin filament structures.”These structural elements give cells their shape and help keep neighboring endothelial cells tightly compacted. “We thought if we could alter the cell-cell junction by using magnetic force, there was a possibility that we could engineer the leakiness of the vessel,” Bao said.The lab created a microfluidic flow chamber that mimicked the vascular system and lined its tubes with real endothelial cells. Experiments proved their hypothesis: When a magnetic field was applied to the nanoparticle-infused cells, the gaps opened. Relaxing the force allowed most gaps to close after 12 hours.Microscopic images showed that fluorescent-tagged nanoparticles were evenly distributed inside the endothelial channel when a magnetic field was not applied. When it was, the particles redistributed, and the force they applied distorted the cytoskeleton. Return to article. Long DescriptionRice researchers prepare a batch of iron-oxide nanoparticles for experiments. They have discovered the particles, along with strong magnets, can be used to open gaps for drug delivery between the endothelial cells that line blood vessels. From left, Gang Bao, Sheng Tong and Linlin Zhang. Photo by Jeff FitlowIn some images, actin filaments that help give a cell its shape were observed lining up with the force. “It’s a pretty dramatic change,” Bao said. “Once you apply the force, given enough time, the structure of the cells changes. That leads to the opening of the cell-cell junction.”Bao said the magnetic force also generates a biological signal that alters the cytoskeletal structure. “It also contributes to the leakiness,” he said. “We’re still trying to understand what kind of signal we give to cells and how the individual cells are responding.”While there are methods to facilitate two types of transport across the endothelial barrier – paracellular (between cells) and transcellular (through cells) – neither has the ability to target specific areas of the body. Bao said his team’s approach offers a solution.He said his group is part of an ongoing collaborative project on knee repair with the lab of Dr. Johnny Huard, a professor of orthopedic surgery at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. “The problem is how to accumulate therapeutic stem cells around the knee and keep them there,” Bao said. “After injecting the nanoparticle-infused cells, we want to put an array of magnets around the knee to attract them. http://news.rice.edu/files/2017/05/0515_MAGNETIC-3-WEB-2eisjbn.jpgRice University researchers prepare a batch of iron-oxide nanoparticles for experiments. They have discovered the particles, along with strong magnets, can be used to open gaps for drug delivery between the endothelial cells that line blood vessels. From left, Gang Bao, Sheng Tong and Linlin Zhang. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) Return to article. Long DescriptionRice researchers prepare nanoparticles between 16 and 33 nanometers in diameter to target endothelial cells. Once inside the cells, they can be manipulated with magnets to open gaps in endothelial cell-cell junctions and allow for controlled drug delivery. Photo by Jeff Fitlow“But if you want to treat the heart or liver, you’d need a pretty large device to have the required magnetic field,” he said. “We don’t have that yet. To drive this to a clinical setting will be a challenge.”Sheng Tong, an associate research professor at Rice, and Yongzhi Qiu, a research associate at Emory University and Georgia Tech, are lead authors of the study. Co-authors are postdoctoral researcher Linlin Zhang and research technician Lin Hong of Rice; researcher Yumiko Sakurai and postdoctoral fellow David Myers of Emory and Georgia Tech; and Wilbur Lam, an assistant professor of hematology and oncology at Emory and of biomedical engineering at Georgia Tech.The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, the National Institutes of Health and the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas supported the research.-30-Read the abstract at https://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms15594Follow Rice News and Media Relations via Twitter @RiceUNews.Related materials:Laboratory of Biomolecular Engineering and Nanomedicine (Bao Group): http://bao.rice.eduLam Lab: http://lamlab.gatech.edu/index.htmlRice Department of Bioengineering: http://bioe.rice.eduImages for download: Return to article. Long DescriptionFluorescent iron-oxide nanoparticles glow in endothelial cells in an experiment at Rice University. At left, the nanoparticles are evenly distributed among the microtubules that help give the cells their shape. At right, after a magnetic field is applied, the nanoparticles are pulled toward one end of the cells and change their shapes. The researchers believe this offers a way to make the endothelial barrier “leaky” enough to allow drug molecules to pass through to reach tissues. Courtesy of the Laboratory of Biomolecular Engineering and NanomedicineThis permeability would allow large-molecule drugs to reach target tissues, Bao said. Strong magnets may be able to lead nanoparticle-infused stem cells or drug-laden nanoparticles themselves to targeted areas, even in deep tissues like organs that current therapies cannot reach, he said.The study appears today in Nature Communications.“For many diseases, systemic delivery through the blood stream is the only way to deliver molecules to the site,” Bao said. “Small molecules can penetrate the blood vessel and get into the diseased cells, but large molecules like proteins or drug-loaded nanoparticles cannot pass the endothelium effectively unless it is leaky.” Rice University researchers prepare a batch of iron-oxide nanoparticles for experiments. They have discovered the particles, along with strong magnets, can be used to open gaps for drug delivery between the endothelial cells that line blood vessels. From left, Gang Bao, Sheng Tong and Linlin Zhang. http://news.rice.edu/files/2017/05/0515_MAGNETIC-4-WEB-24hzgo4.jpgRice University researchers prepare nanoparticles between 16 and 33 nanometers in diameter to target endothelial cells. Once inside the cells, they can be manipulated with magnets to open gaps in endothelial cell-cell junctions and allow for controlled drug delivery. (Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) Under the influence of a magnet, nanoparticles realign actin filaments in endothelial cells. Rice University researchers suspect such realignment can disrupt the junctions between endothelial cells and increase vascular permeability. Share1Editor’s note: Links to high-resolution images for download appear at the end of this release. David Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduMike Williams713-348-6728mikewilliams@rice.eduMaking vessels leaky on demand could aid drug deliveryRice University scientists use magnets and nanoparticles to open, close gaps in blood vessels HOUSTON – (June 8, 2017) – The endothelial cells that line blood vessels are packed tightly to keep blood inside and flowing, but scientists at Rice University and their colleagues have discovered it may be possible to selectively open gaps in those barriers just enough to let large molecules through — and then close them again.Rice bioengineer Gang Bao and collaborators at Emory University and the Georgia Institute of Technology reported using magnets to help iron-oxide nanoparticles invade endothelial cells both in the lab and in vivo. Then they use the same magnets to make vessels temporarily “leaky.”last_img read more