Flipboard Has Slipped The Surly Bonds Of Apps

first_imgThe Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Tags:#Browsers#Flipboard#Mike McCue#web applications#Web publishing Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech …center_img Flipboard, a pioneer of tablet apps, has launched a full Web version of its news reader.In a break from its signature “flip” metaphor, Flipboard for Web embraces scrolling, the natural gesture people use to read on the Web. And it’s hoping that lush, photo-heavy layouts will encourage people to keep reading.Flipboard CEO Mike McCue unveiled the new product at a launch event in Flipboard’s original office in downtown Palo Alto Tuesday morning.In 2010, McCue and his team considered launching a Web-based news reader, but decided to embrace Apple’s then-rumored iPad tablet instead. When the iPad launched, Flipboard became a standard-bearer for Apple’s new mobile platform.“It was pretty clear to us that it wasn’t ready to happen in the Web browsers of that time,” McCue told me. The iPad allowed Flipboard’s designers to reimagine the Web, stripped of gaudy banner ads, awkward side rails, and other cruft it accumulated over the past two decades.Flipboard CEO Mike McCue demonstrates an earlier version of Flipboard for Web.A lot has happened since 2010, though. The Web has quietly become vastly more capable. And it’s no secret that tablet sales—particularly iPad sales—have stalled. And Flipboard has seen its strongest growth since launching mobile apps for smartphones.Over the past two years, we’ve seen Flipboard tiptoe back onto the Web, first with tools for people who created “magazines”—editorial selections of links—on the app, and later with full Web versions of those magazines. But Flipboard as a news-reading experience remained app-only until now.That hasn’t held back its growth: Flipboard has grown from about 35 million active monthly readers in October, when it launched a third major version of its app, to 50 million today, McCue said.One consideration for Flipboard in launching a full Web version, McCue said, was interest by the publishers it’s working with, who still “do a considerable portion of their business on the Web.” Flipboard is increasingly working to place and sell ads in Flipboard magazines, including major print publishers like Condé Nast and Time Inc. as well as smaller publishers and individual magazine creators.In August, McCue revealed at our ReadWriteMix event that Flipboard had started cutting checks to smaller publishers. Here’s the full video of that interview:Screenshot via Marcos Weskamp’s Flipboard Related Posts owen thomaslast_img read more

Last-Minute Apple Watch Rumor Roundup: Secret Labs And Smart Straps

first_imgThe Key to Mass Adoption of Wearables Related Posts david nield 4 Ways Big Data & VR Are Changing Professi… With just days to go before we get to see the finished Apple Watch in all its wearable glory, the Web is awash with gossip and rumor—of varying plausibility—about the smartwatch and its imminent arrival.Bloomberg has news of a “secret lab” where app developers have been hunkered down getting software ready for the device. Apps from Facebook, BMW and United Airlines are said to be among those being prepared for the launch event, and the impression they leave on users could be a key factor in Apple shifting units in the first few weeks.According to the Bloomberg report, the app developer room is cut off from the outside world: there’s no Internet access and you can’t bring in so much as a pad of paper. Code is being stored on hard drives which are physically shipped between locations to avoid leaks.As crucial as apps are to the success of the Apple Watch, they could hurt its chances too: overuse of the device’s sensors or screen is likely to make a shaky battery life situation even worse. Apple is rumored to have placed limits on what developers can do for exactly this reason.The Smart Strap That (Maybe) Isn’tElsewhere, TechCrunch has heard of a hidden port on the Apple Watch that allows for direct access to the OS—and which could ultimately be used for smart strap accessories. These bands might offer extra sensors or battery life, for example. Pebble is pursuing a similar idea.The 6-dot brass contact array is underneath the bottom strap connector slot, TechCrunch says, and has so far only been used for diagnostic purposes. 9to5Mac suggests this is actually a Lightning port solely for developer use, and it won’t be making it to units shipped to consumers.With space on the Apple Watch at a premium, it seems unlikely that a port will make it to the finished product, but we’ll know more on Monday. Apple should also reveal an exact shipping date and price tiers for the more expensive models.Photo courtesy of Applecenter_img How Wearables Will Take Health Monitoring to th… Tags:#Apple#Apple Watch#battery life#smart strap#smartwatches#wearables You Think Your Employees WANT to Wear That Devi…last_img read more

NPM Wants To Push JavaScript Developers To Make Lego-Like Web Apps

first_img7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac… Growing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoid Tags:#GitHub#JavaScript#modular programming#npm#premium hosting How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? lauren orsinicenter_img Why You Love Online Quizzes For all its virtues as the lingua franca for developing Web apps, JavaScript hasn’t always lent itself to modern and efficient programming practices. Not long ago, for instance, shortcomings in the language led many developers to write JavaScript programs as huge, monolithic entities instead of building them from common and reusable software building blocks, also known as “modules.”JavaScript is more amenable to such Lego-like modularization than it used to be, but the practice still isn’t as widespread as some would like. So NPM, a startup mainly known for eponymous open-source software that installs and manages JavaScript programs, has decided to give things a nudge in the right direction.Its new initiative is called Private Modules, and at first glance it mainly looks like a premium code-repository service, similar in many respects to GitHub’s services. NPM already offered a free Javascript-only repository service for open-source code. Private Modules introduces a paid option for developers or companies that want to keep their JavaScript private.But that’s not the interesting element here. Where GitHub’s paid options limit users to a specific number of proprietary-code repositories—$7 to $50 a month gets you between five and 50 private code repositories—NPM has gone, well, unlimited. A flat fee of $7 a month for individuals, or $5 a month per person at an organization, gets you as many private JavaScript-storage buckets as you want.Why unlimited? Because, NPM CEO and founder Isaac Schlueter says, it will encourage companies to build and use individual JavaScript code modules, each of which can now live in its own repository.All Mod(ule) ConsNPM CEO Isaac Schlueter“There’s a broad trend where people are switching from building monolithic apps to small modules that can be pieced together,” Schlueter told me in an interview.Such modules vastly simplify the process of both building and updating programs. Much the way it’s far simpler to replace a light fixture than to completely rewire your house, it’s much easier to pull out and replace an old code module with a new one than it would be to rewrite a much larger monolithic program.See also: How Node.js Stays On TrackNPM’s move here basically reinforces the notion of modularity at the repository level. It’s an idea you might even sum up in a slogan: “One repo, one module.”Edmond Meinfelder, director of Web and mobile engineering at DocuSign, uses NPM Enterprise to manage the company’s massive—and monolithic—JavaScript codebase. “We have a huge legacy code base, but we’re just starting to refactor it and break it down into small modules,” he said. “Modules are easy to understand, easy to write tests for, and make creating new functionality much easier.”While Meinfelder said DocuSign will continue to use the Enterprise option since it’s tailored to large companies, he plans to use Private Modules as an individual. Furthermore, he said that NPM’s move in this area helped DocuSign realize that it’s worth the effort to break its JavaScript programs down into modules:On Private Modules, you could host all the modules of an app without worrying about going over your pricing plan. Private Modules shows companies and individuals that its within their price range to build apps the right way.More Modules … And Fewer Users?When the announcement made Hacker News Tuesday, however, some individual developers were less enthusiastic about the new direction. One major concern: Private Modules might effectively limit the number of users who can work on non-open-source projects. GitHub’s premium pay-per-repository model, by contrast, encourages unlimited collaboration on a limited number of repositories.“Everything looks pretty awesome, except the payment model… With NPM’s model all my collaborators will have to pay for NPM private modules as well,” one commenter noted. Another suggested that NPM’s per-user payment scheme might turn off small companies:Sounds like a big pain to have to pay individually for each person on a team if your company wants to use private modules. We’re generally willing to throw money at problems like those private modules solve, but if we have to do it a dozen times it probably isn’t going to happen.Schlueter remains confident that NPM is moving in the right direction by encouraging practices that have been spreading among developers for decades.“If we want to look back to the historical roots of this decision, even the shift from Multix to UNIX was about splitting up code into independent parts,” he said. “From the GNU Revision Control System to Git, the trend has been for things being broken into smaller pieces. NPM is a really good example of that in practice.”Lead image by David Hamilton for ReadWrite (via Build with Chrome); photo of Isaac Schlueter courtesy of NPM Related Posts last_img read more

12 Ways to Get an Industry Rock Star to Join Your Startup

first_imgAI Will Empower Leaders, Not Replace Them Guest author Scott Gerber is the founder of the Young Entrepreneur Council.When you’re a young entrepreneur, you might be excited to start something with your peers. However, you likely also recognize that more experienced talent would help you out. If you don’t have years of industry experience, you’re probably making more than a few rookie mistakes. The right talent, especially on your senior leadership team, can help you make better decisions as you grow.So how do you convince more experienced folks to join your team, especially when your startup is relatively unproven? Twelve young entrepreneurs from YEC share the tactics they used to convince industry rock stars to sign on.Let Them Make A DifferenceIn my experience, the best more-experienced hires tend to be the executives with big-company experience who appreciate the difference they can make in a smaller environment with much faster decision-making. Someone who led a sales or product development team can make more independent decisions and have a much bigger impact in a startup environment. In a meritocracy, the standout performers will be recognized and acknowledged, creating a very positive feedback loop. —Elliot Bohm, CardCashFocus On Vision And Challenges To SolveIn the current market environment, talented senior people have a huge number of opportunities. As a startup, you will not be able to compete on compensation, and if you do attract someone because you’re the highest bidder, be ready to lose them when someone else inevitably has more money. Focus your recruiting on what problems you’re trying to solve and what your bigger vision is. We recently brought on a technical lead who’d spent the previous four years at a high-growth startup. He was passionate about our vision, but also loved the culture of our company. Make someone happy with their team and fulfilled in their projects, and you’ll have a great long-term partner. —Aaron Schwartz, Modify WatchesMake It ExcitingMany people love the idea of a startup, but personal situations do not always allow them to start something from scratch on their own. If they can plug themselves into a startup that is a bit more established and use their expertise and skill to make it better, that can be an exciting change for their career. They are no longer just a cog in a machine, and can truly make a difference. Letting them participate in the financial upside when the company is a success also makes it more compelling, and makes them feel like they are part of something. —Jay Johnson, Small Lot WineAlways Be ImprovingWe were told by a veteran in the industry that one of the most exciting parts of our organization is the sense that we are “tinkering”—innovating by looking under the hood of the model and striving for creative ways to make it better. For more experienced folks, the lure of being able to “tinker,” to try new things and break out of more firmly rooted ways of thinking, can be appealing. —Lindsay Tanne, LogicPrepHave Them Talk To Founders And Early EmployeesThe proof is in the pudding for more experienced professionals. Have them connect with your cofounders and early employees, and hear directly from them why they left their previous jobs to work with you. The people on your team can tell the story of why it’s worth it to work at your startup from a different perspective, one that’s not as invested in the outcome of recruiting as yours. Potential new hires with more experience will also appreciate this as a sign of confidence that the people already on your team are happy with their work and enjoy themselves at your startup. Make sure to connect these potential experienced new hires with people within your company who have a similar background and history to their own, so it’ll be easier for them to relate to each other. —Dave Nevogt, HubstaffMatch Their PurposeWe recently hired a VP with more than 20 years of experience who had an offer from us (a fast-growing but midsize PR firm) and an offer from a publicly traded powerhouse company. There’s no way we could have competed on stock options, perks, 401K, salary, and so forth. What it came down to for her was that we had a need that perfectly aligned with the purpose she was pursing in her career. In her former position, she was hired for one roll, but the company truly needed her to do something else (which she did). Now she’s with us, doing exactly what we said we needed, which is what she wanted all along, and she’s flourishing. —Beck Bamberger, BAM CommunicationsBring Them On As A CofounderI met my current cofounder when he reached out to me via LinkedIn. We’re both from the same city and when we met to discuss further, I was very impressed by his honesty and willingness to build something together. We needed to figure out if we were a good fit, and also how much of our own money we were willing to put up for bootstrapping our company. Because he met me with a spirit of collaboration and sharing, I was much more willing to be open about my own finances. We settled on an equal contribution of startup capital that was feasible for us both, committed to sharing equity 50-50 and haven’t looked back since. I was an experienced entrepreneur and software development consultant at that point, but I was willing to come on board because I was treated fairly, as an equal. —Jared Brown, HubstaffShow Them Your Plan For SuccessDo not just convince, but show the individual where you are going and how you are going to get there. Allow them to believe they are an integral piece of the plan. A potential employee will want to join something they feel like they are a part of, and also something that is headed in the right direction. —Jayna Cooke, EventupLet Your Product Speak For ItselfMy company, Uassist.me, has some really amazing partnerships right now. You really don’t have to do a lot of convincing if your service or product speaks for itself. For us, it’s been a matter of having a person sign up to work with one of our virtual assistants, and after working with us for a while, coming to realize they want to be part of our team and what we’re building. —Alfredo Atanacio, Uassist.meMake It Easy To Say YesEveryone has different motivations and desires. Try to determine why each candidate is interested in your company, and then focus on the important items. This could be responsibility, prestige, money or a hundred different things. If you can identify their true desires then you can make your best effort to give them an offer they can’t refuse. When we made a key C-level hire we faced this exact problem. As a small company we did not have the bank balance to compete on straight salary, but the individual placed huge value on flexibility, responsibility and a feeling of ownership. These were things we could easily accommodate while other, more cash-rich companies could not. The result has been fantastic, and we got to add some much needed “grey hair.” —Douglas Hutchings, PicasolarDevelop Experienced Executives As AdvisorsOne approach to getting the best people in the world excited about your business is to develop them as advocates, and to be less concerned initially about the specific role they could potentially play. A lower commitment advisory role is a great way for someone to get to know you and the business, see the trajectory of your business first hand and get excited about what you’re doing. —Katrina Lake, Stitch FixShowcase Your Own Background“Startup” can be a dirty word to some people in sectors like real estate and finance, so it’s important to build a strong bridge between expertise and opportunity. Let potential senior hires know how your own background and experiences shaped your outlook and led you to your current venture. —Heather Schwarz-Lopes, EarlySharesPhoto by Jonathan Kos-Read How Connected Communities Can Bolster Your Busi… How to Cultivate the Skill of Being a Creative … Related Posts center_img scott gerber How to Meet the Demands of the Socially Conscio… Tags:#hiring#recruiting#yec last_img read more

Surprise! There’s More To The Future Of Marketing Than Just Big Data

first_imgsid shah Tags:#Big Data#Digital Marketing#Guest Posts#marketing Kickstarting a Stagnant Company Related Posts What Nobody Teaches You About Getting Your Star…center_img How to Make the Most of Your Software Developer… WordPress for Enterprise – How This Open-… Guest author Sid Shah is director of business analytics for Adobe’s digital marketing business.Big data has come to advertising. Marketers use computers and algorithms to collect and analyze reams of data on customer behavior. That information is funneled into sophisticated software that can, in real time, adjust online ad design to the preferences of specific browsers in order to maximize the chance of a sale.Big data can be and is powerful. But marketers must avoid becoming overly dependent on it. There are important complexities within the human character that no computer can comprehend and there’s more to marketing than math. It takes a level of creativity that only humans possess to interpret big data and make it meaningful.Big Data Alone Doesn’t Mean Bigger SalesResearch from my company, Adobe, shows that companies that embrace creative marketing are 3.5 times more likely to see their annual sales revenue grow by 10 percent or more compared with companies that exclusively rely on big data.Buyers’ behavior isn’t always rational. People make strange decisions that defy neat algorithmic understanding. Often, customers are not simply looking for the highest-quality product for the lowest possible price.Indeed, the burgeoning field of behavioral economics is revealing on an almost daily basis how irrational consumers can be—and how seemingly irrelevant factors can influence purchasing decisions. Savvy marketing adapts to these nuances. Take, for instance, an ad commissioned by The Economist. It marketed an online-only subscription to the magazine for $59, a print-only subscription for $125, and a combined print-and-web subscription for … $125.Those offerings defy logic. Why let subscribers pay the same amount for print-only as for both print and Web? But this pricing scheme was designed to make the combination more appealing. It worked. Subscriptions increased, and The Economist secured its position as one of the few profitable newsweeklies.Choice ResultsThere are similar quirks when it comes to choice. A strictly rational marketing approach would call for providing customers with as many options as possible in order to maximize the chance that they’ll see something they like.But there is such a thing as too much choice. People can feel overwhelmed—and decline to buy anything at all.One study compared a group of customers selecting from 24 types of gourmet jams with a group choosing from just six. The former were 90 percent less likely to make a purchase. Marketing based solely on big data may fail to account for such behavior.Selling IntimacyFinally, big data can never replace the very human work of establishing an individual, emotional connection with a customer.A landmark 1993 Harvard Business Review article coined a term for this connection: “customer intimacy.” Researchers looked at a protocol at Home Depot that encouraged clerks to spend as long as necessary with guests to make sure they found the right product, even if the sale in the end was minimal.Home Depot doesn’t just sell products. By spending so much time with each customer, the retailer is also selling the information and service its shoppers are demanding. That kind of personalized attention engendered fierce loyalty to the Home Depot brand—loyalty that translates to profit. Tellingly, when Home Depot replaced knowledgeable employees with part-timers, it hurt sales—and Home Depot is trying to fix the problem by, guess what, having clerks once again spend more time with customers.)Marketing In 2025Even in a world of supercomputers and powerful software, human creativity still has a crucial role to play in marketing. The advertising strategies of the future will incorporate the best of both worlds, coupling sophisticated technology with old-fashioned intuition.Such an approach may require companies to fundamentally rethink core parts of their business.Take, for instance, the design of brick-and-mortar stores. Despite the rising popularity of e-commerce, customers still value the physical retail experience. Eighty-five percent actually prefer brick-and-mortar-stores to online retail.People don’t want to choose between online and offline shopping. They want both. Research indicates that 72 percent of millennials research and shop their options online before going to a store or the mall.There’s a real hunger for a quality in-store experience. Yet most retail businesses don’t deliver one. For years, they’ve stuck with the same uninspired flyers and television commercials—as well as the same old layout, with row after row of barely organized products.Creative firms could enhance the in-store experience to drive sales. For instance, they could develop a smartphone app that allows users to navigate stores and compare features of specific products. That’s the best of both worlds.The marketing of the future will couple the best of big data with the best of human intuition. That’s the formula for establishing long-term customer loyalty in an ever-more competitive marketplace.Photo via Shutterstocklast_img read more

U.S. Employee of International Organization Liable for U.S. Self-Employment Tax (Sisson, TCM)

first_imgA U.S. citizen, who performed services in the U.S. as an employee of an international quasi-governmental agency, was liable for self-employment taxes for the year his bankruptcy case was open. Contrary to the taxpayer’s argument, the bankruptcy estate was not liable for the individual’s tax liability because the payments he received from the international organization were not wages for employment tax purposes, but earnings from self-employment. While his bankruptcy estate was open, his earnings were property of the estate and the estate paid his personal living expenses. Moreover, the bankruptcy estate was a separate taxpayer and the trustee was required to pay the tax computed on its taxable income, which included the debtor’s earnings from services performed after filing his bankruptcy petition. Thus, the debtor should not have reported the earnings from his employment on his own return for the year at issue because the estate was liable for tax on that income. However, the self-employment tax is imposed on gross income derived from a trade or business, less deductions (i.e. net earnings from self-employment). Since the self-employment tax is not a tax on taxable income, it is not the tax imposed on the bankruptcy estate by Code Sec. 1398(c)(1) and there is no other provision that imposes self-employment tax on the estate. Therefore, the estate was not liable for the individual’s self-employment taxes.C.A. Sisson, TC Memo. 2016-143, Dec. 60,661(M)Other References:Code Sec. 1398CCH Reference – 2016FED ¶32,414.50Code Sec. 1402CCH Reference – 2016FED ¶32,578.298Tax Research ConsultantCCH Reference – TRC INDIV: 63,100CCH Reference – TRC INDIV: 66,052.05last_img read more

Massachusetts Is Accepting 2018 Tax Payments

first_imgMassachusetts has started accepting estimated payments from individual income taxpayers for 2018.A Department of Revenue press release states that payments can only be made from MassTaxConnect (MTC) login page. To get started taxpayers can click on “Make a payment” under “Quick Links”.The department also informs taxpayers that, although the MTC system defaults to a 2017 payment, it provides a checkbox to choose a 2018 payment instead. If a taxpayer is making both 2017 and 2018 payments, the process would be repeated.Also, the department clarifies that all 2018 payments should be made through MTC as the department’s systems have not been updated to process paper checks for 2018.Press Release, Massachusetts Department of Revenue, December 14, 2017Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

Illinois Proposes Regs on Combined Reporting for Unitary Groups

first_imgIllinois addresses combined apportionment for unitary groups with members that apportion their income differently. In proposed rules, the Department of Revenue addresses 2017 legislation that permits unitary groups to include members that use different apportionment formulas.Industry Specific Apportionment Rules Still UsedThe new apportionment formula, in effect as of January 1, 2018, begins with subrgroups of members that use the same industry specific apportionment formula apportioning income as though they are a separate unitary group. The Department of Revenue’s regulation provides an example of a unitary business group with sales members, insurance company members, and transportation members. The example illustrates how the proposed apportionment changes work.Industry Specific Apportionment Still FollowedComments on the proposed rules must be submitted no later than 45 days after their publication date in the register. The proposed rule is printed in the Illinois Register, as well as the address to submit comments.Proposed 86 Ill. Adm. Code Sec. 100.3600, Illinois Register, Vol. 2, Iss. 45, November 9, 2018Login to read more tax news on CCH® AnswerConnect or CCH® Intelliconnect®.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

Virginia Enacts IRC Conformity Legislation

first_imgRecent Virginia legislation advances the state’s IRC conformity date to December 31, 2018. As a result, Virginia now generally conforms to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) and the Bipartisan Budget Act (BBA) of 2018. Exceptions to Virginia’s conformity are noted below.The legislation also makes a number of changes in response to the federal tax reform legislation. These include:– increasing the state’s standard deduction;– enacting a deduction for real and personal property taxes;– enacting a deduction for 20% of business interest disallowed as a deduction under IRC Sec. 163(j);– expanding the state’s subtracion for Subpart F income to include GILTI (IRC Sec. 951A); and– establishing a Taxpayer Relief Fund.Conformity Exceptions for Tax Year 2018Under the legislation, Virginia does not conform to the following:– special bonus depreciation allowance for certain property;– five-year carryback period for certain net operating losses (NOLs);– deductions related to the original issue discount on applicable high-yield discount obligations;– exclusions related to cancellation of debt income; and– the overall limitation on itemized deductions for certain taxpayers for tax years beginning after 2018.Virginia Standard DeductionFor tax years 2019 through 2025, the state standard deduction is increased to:– from $3,000 to $4,500 for individuals; and– from $6,000 to $9,000 for married taxpayers filing joint returns.Deduction for Real and Personal Property TaxesReal and personal property taxes not otherwise deducted because of the federal limitation on the state and local tax deduction may be subtracted. The subtraction is effective for tax years after 2018 and applies to taxes imposed by Virginia or any other taxing jurisdiction.Federal Business Interest DeductionFor tax years beginning after 2017, corporate and personal income taxpayers may subtract 20% of business interest disallowed as a deduction under IRC Sec. 163(j).Expansion of Subpart F Subtraction to Include GILTIThe legislation expands the state’s current subtraction for Subpart F income to include IRC Sec. 951A global intangible low-taxed income (GILTI). The inclusion of GILTI applies to tax years beginning after 2017. The subtraction applies to the extent the income is included in federal taxable income. Specifically, this means taxpayers may claim a subtraction equal to the net inclusion of GILTI after considering the offset of any deduction allowed, including IRC Sec. 250.Refunds and the Taxpayer Relief FundUnder the legislation, taxpayers filing a complete tax year 2018 income tax return are eligible for a refund up to the following amounts:– $110 for individuals; and– $220 for married taxpayers filing joint returns.A refund is allowed up to the amount of a taxpayer’s tax liability after the application of any deductions, subtractions, or credits. Refunds will be issued October 1 through October 15, 2019. The bill also establishes a special, nonreverting fund (Taxpayer Relief Fund) for additional revenues generated by TCJA.Processing of TY 2018 Personal Income Tax ReturnsThe enactment of this legislation allows the Virginia Department of Taxation to being processing returns for this year. Taxpayers should expect a longer turnaround time for refunds due to a large backlog of returns already submitted. Taxpayers should consult the instructions for the appropriate 2018 Virginia income tax return for information regarding how to make adjustments.The Virginia Department of Taxation has issued guidance regarding the conformity legislation, available at https://tax.virginia.gov/guidance-documents.Ch. 17 (H.B. 2529) and Ch. 18 (S.B. 1372), Laws 2019, effective February 15, 2019, and applicable as noted; Tax Bulletin 19-1, Virginia Department of Taxation, February 15, 2019; Virginia Tax to Begin Processing Returns, Virginia Department of Taxation, February 15, 2019Login to read more on CCHAnswerConnect.Not a subscriber? Sign up for a free trial or contact us for a representative.last_img read more

Councilman defends Columbia city manager finalist

first_imgOf all the city manager candidates out there, why did Columbia pick a finalist who’s been fired three times and taken at least one old employer to court?MLive.com reports James Palenick’s run with a town in New Mexico ended with a legal battle, among other stops that were contentious at times.Councilman Michael Trapp says on The Gary Nolan Show that’s actually pretty common in this job.“Most city manager positions end badly. City councils and mayors get elected, and then they hire a person who shares a vision with the majority of those folks, and then they change.”Palenick is now the city administrator in Racine, Wisconsin. He’s up against Columbia’s interim city manager, John Glascock. You can meet them during an open house Wednesday night from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at city hall.last_img read more

Workstations – The Innovation Engine: Serial or Simultaneous Workflows – Which one do you want? Part 2

first_imghave the ability to process and visualize large scale problems that not long ago demanded access to a share of high performance computer. Today users can have supercomputer performance under their desk and if they choose to change the way they work, they can employ the available compute and visualization resources to generate new ideas, or simply refine existing products faster than ever before. corporations as they potentially reduce product development time as they accelerate the move from concept, to initial design, through revision and interaction through dissemination. Let’s look at the manufacturing vertical where you hear words like design optimization, digital prototyping, or analysis driven design. With workstation supercomputers, workers can effectively design, mesh and simulate on one platform. In fact recent test with ISV’s confirm users can solve large scale problems (e.g. 5 million degree of freedom finite element models) and still maintain a rigorous interactive workload. That’s right, no more dreaded hour glass, or more importantly no disengaging in creative thought as you wait and you wait. Unfortunately, that also means fewer coffee breaks.Simultaneous workflows are not a far fetched idea. In fact today users can initiate design optimization before an FEA model is even generated. Users today can simply select which dimensions in a CAD model may need to be optimized, apply the design criterion, which may include maximum stresses, temperatures or frequencies. The analysis process appropriate for the design criteria is then performed. The results of the analysis are compared with the design criterion, and, if necessary without any human intervention, the CAD geometry is updated. Now that is cool. Not new, but very cool and with workstation supercomputers based Intel® Xeon® processors power users can employ up to 8 computational engines and over 100 GFLOPS(1) of 64 bit computing performance in an attempt to out innovate their competition. These new workstations actually resemble yesterday’s high performance supercomputers – with some very visual difference – As I mentioned in my previous blog, extreme performance and extreme visualization found in today’s Intel based workstations can combine to help change the way users work and can help play a significant role in a users successful use of simultaneous workflows to innovate faster. Getting to simultaneous workflows is not easy, but the rewards can potentially be spectacular. The hard work in developing these new workflows can also be rewarding to both: they are smaller and workers , as the think out side the box on how these new simultaneous flows can reduce development timelast_img read more

Grove City College Enhances Academic Mobility with Intel® Solid-State Drives and Intel® Anti-Theft Technology

first_imgDedicated to using technology to enhance the academic experience, Pennsylvania’s Grove City College has been providing all incoming freshmen with laptop computers for more than 15 years. To reduce hard drive failures that can halt productivity, and to minimize the impact of theft, the school’s IT group distributes Intel® Core™ i7 vPro™ processor-based HP EliteBook* tablet computers with Intel® Solid-State Drives and Intel® Anti-Theft Technology. The Intel Solid-State Drives cut system imaging time in half and could reduce drive failures by 90 percent. Intel Anti-Theft Technology helps the IT group prevent information from falling into the wrong hands.“The tablets arrived only two weeks before the students,” said Vincent DiStasi, chief information officer for Grove City College. “Fortunately, the performance of the Intel Solid-State Drives enabled us to image all 750 tablets in just two days. We had all systems ready in time, and we didn’t have to spend the summer loading software.”To learn more, read our new Grove City College business success story. As always, you can find this one, and many others, in the Intel.com Reference Room and IT Center.last_img read more

High Performance Packet Processing in the NFV World

first_imgNetwork transformation is taking off like a rocket … with the SDN, NFV, and network virtualization market accounting for nearly $10 Billion (USD) in 2015, according to SNS Research.(1) This momentum will take front stage this week at Mobile World Congress (MWC) 2015, including dozens of solutions and demos that spotlight Intel technology.New Ways to Speed up Packet ProcessingPacket processing workloads are continuously evolving and becoming more complex, as seen by progressing SDN/Network-overlay standards and signature-based DPI, just to name a few examples. One requires highly flexible software and silicon ingredients to deliver cost-effective solutions to cater to these workloads. NFV solutions are all judged on how fast they can move packets on virtualized, general-purpose hardware. This is why the Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) is seen as a critical capability, delivering packet processing performance improvements in the range of 25 to 50 times( 2, 3) on Intel® processors.Building upon the DPDK, Intel will demonstrate at MWC how equipment manufacturers can boost performance further while making NFV more reliable. One way is to greatly reduce cache trashing by pinning L3 cache memory to high-priority applications using Intel Cache Allocation Technology. Another is to use a DPDK-based pipeline to process packets instead of distributing the load across multiples cores, which can result in bottlenecks if the flows cannot be uniformly distributed.Intel Cache Allocation TechnologyIt’s no secret that virtualization inherently introduces overheads that lead to some level of application performance degradation compared to a non-virtualized environment. Most are aware of the more obvious speed bumps, like virtual machine (VM) enters/exits and memory address translations.A lesser known performance degrader is caused by various VMs competing for the same cache space, called cache contention. When the hypervisor switches context to a VM that is a cache hog, cache entries for the other VMs get evicted, only to be reloaded when those VMs start up again. This can result in an endless cycle of cache reloads that can cut performance in half, as shown in the figure. (2, 3)On the left side, the guest VM implementing a three-stage packet processing pipeline (classify, L3 forward, and traffic shaper) has the L3 cache to itself, so it can forward packets at 11 Mpps. The middle pane introduces an aggressor VM that consumes more than half the cache, and the throughput of the guest VM drops to 4 Mpps. The right side implements Intel Cache Allocation Technology, which pins the majority of the cache to the guest VM, thus restoring the packet forwarding throughput to 11 Mpps. (2, 3)IP Pipeline Using DPDKThere are two common models for processing packets on multi-core platforms:Run-to-completion: A distributor divides incoming traffic flows among multiple processor cores, each processing their assigned flows to completion.Pipeline: All traffic is processed by a pipeline constructed of several processor cores, each performing a different packet processing function in series.At MWC 2015, Intel will have a live demonstration of high-performance NFV running on industry standard high volume server, where copies of packet processing pipelines are implemented in multiple VMs, and the performance of these VMs is governed using state-of-the-art Cache Monitoring and Allocation Technologies.Want to know more? Get more information on Intel in Packet Processing.Are you at MWC 2015?Check out the high-performance NFV demo at the Intel Booth and see the new Intel technologies developed to drive even higher levels of performance in SDN and NFV! Visit us at MWC 2015 – App Planet, hall 8.1, stand #8.1E41.1 Source: PR Newswire, “The SDN, NFV & Network Virtualization Bible: 2015 – 2020 – Opportunities, Challenges, Strategies & Forecasts.” Nov 27, 2014, http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/the-sdn-nfv–network-virtualization-bible-2015–2020–opportunities-challenges-strategies–forecasts-300002078.html.2 Performance estimates are based on L2/L3 packet forwarding measurements.3 Performance tests and ratings are measured using specific computer systems and/or components and reflect the approximate performance of Intel® products as measured by those tests. Any difference in system hardware or software design or configuration may affect actual performance. Buyers should consult other sources of information to evaluate the performance of systems or components they are considering purchasing. For more information on performance tests and on the performance of Intel products, visit Intel Performance Benchmark Limitations.last_img read more

How Utilities Can Embrace Technology

first_imgTechnology is having a big impact on the utility sector, and the prediction is that faster change is coming in the years ahead. To learn more, we caught up with Perry Stoneman, Corporate Vice President for Sectors and Utilities at Capgemini, to talk about how technology is changing the utility industry.Watch the above video interview and let me know what questions you have. How do you see the utility industry changing thanks to technology?last_img

Momentum Builds for the ‘Cloudification’ of Storage

first_imgHere’s a prediction for 2016: The year ahead will bring the increasing “cloudification” of enterprise storage. And so will the years that follow—because cloud storage models offer the best hope for the enterprise to deal with unbounded data growth in a cost-effective manner.In the context of storage, cloudification refers to the disaggregation of applications from the underlying storage infrastructure. Storage arrays that previously operated as silos dedicated to particular applications are treated as a single pool of virtualized storage that can be allocated to any application, anywhere, at any time, all in a cloud-like manner. Basically, cloudification takes today’s storage silos and turns them on their sides.There are many benefits to this new approach that pools storage resources. In lots of ways, those benefits are similar to the benefits delivered by pools of virtualized servers and virtualized networking resources. For starters, cloudification of storage enables greater IT agility and easier management, because storage resources can now be allocated and managed via a central console. This eliminates the need to coordinate the work of teams of people to configure storage systems in order to deploy or scale an application. What used to take days or weeks can now be done in minutes.And then there are the all-important financial benefits. A cloud approach to storage can greatly increase the utilization of the underlying storage arrays. And then there are the all-important financial benefits. A cloud approach to storage can greatly increase the utilization of the storage infrastructure; deferring capital outlays and reducing operational costs.This increased utilization becomes all the more important with ongoing data growth. The old model of continually adding storage arrays to keep pace with data growth and new data retention requirements is no longer sustainable. The costs are simply too high for all those new storage arrays and the data center floor space that they consume. We now have to do more to reclaim the value of the resources we already have in place.Cloudification isn’t a new concept, of course. The giants of the cloud world—such as Google, Facebook, and Amazon Web Services—have taken this approach from their earliest days. It is one of their keys to delivering high-performance data services at a huge scale and a relatively low cost. What is new is the introduction of cloud storage in enterprise environments. As I noted in my blog on non-volatile memory technologies, today’s cloud service providers are, in effect, showing enterprises the path to more efficient data centers and increased IT agility.Many vendors are stepping up to help enterprises make the move to on-premises cloud-style storage. Embodiments of the cloudification concept include Google’s GFS and its successor Colossus, Facebook’s HDFS, Microsoft’s Windows Azure Storage (WAS), Red Hat’s Ceph/Rados (and GlusterFS), Nutanix’s Distributed File System (NDFS), among many others.The Technical ViewAt this point, I will walk through the architecture of a cloud storage environment, for the benefit of those who want the more technical view.Regardless of the scale or vendor, most of the implementations share the same storage system architecture. That architecture has three main components: a name service, a two-tiered storage service, and a replicated log service. The architectural drill-down looks like this:The “name service” is a directory of all the volume instances currently being managed. Volumes are logical data containers, each with a unique name—in other words a namespace of named-objects. A user of storage services attaches to their volume via a directory lookup that resolves the name to the actual data container.This data container actually resides in a two-tier storage service. The frontend tier is optimized for memory. All requests submitted by end-users are handled by this tier: metadata lookups as well as servicing read requests out of cache and appending write operations to the log.The backend tier of the storage service provides a device-based, stable store. The tier is composed of a set of device pools, each pool providing a different class of service. Simplistically, one can imagine this backend tier supporting two device pools. One pool provides high performance but has a relatively small amount of capacity. The second pool provides reduced performance but a huge amount of capacity.Finally, it is important to tease out the frontend tier’s log facility as a distinct, 3rd component. This is because this facility key to being able to support performant write requests while satisfying data availability and durability requirements.In the weeks ahead, I will take up additional aspects of the cloudification of storage. In the meantime, you can learn about things Intel is doing to enable this new approach to storage at intel.com/storage.last_img read more

Deep Fritz Ties Kramnik

first_imgComputers don’t tire, crack under time pressure, or get psyched out–and that makes them formidable chess players. In Bahrain last week, world champion Vladimir Kramnik and chess computer Deep Fritz drew the final game of their eight-game series, and the “Brains in Bahrain” match was declared a tie. But it was a substantial victory for the creators of Deep Fritz, who proved that computers can match the abilities of even the best human chess players.In 1997, then-champion Garry Kasparov lost a six-game match to IBM’s improved Deep Blue computer, but many chess aficionados (including Kasparov) argued that the tournament was unfair. For instance, Kasparov wasn’t given the opportunity to learn about his opponent, says Frederic Friedel of Hamburg-based ChessBase and one of the people behind the Deep Fritz program. Friedel and colleagues allowed Kramnik to play with the program for 3 months.At heart, Deep Fritz is very much like other advanced chess computers; it has a vast database of openings and endings, and it relies on brute force–with some fine-tunings–to go through all possible moves and decide on the best line to play. After the first game, which was a draw, Kramnik solidly beat Deep Fritz twice in a row and then drew again. “We thought that we would lose very badly,” says Friedel. But the pressure of an opponent that never tired wore the champion down. “We could see it in his face,” Friedel recalls. “It was rather ghastly.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Under time pressure, Kramnik slipped up and lost the next round. In game six, however, Kramnik made a dramatic move. After pondering for 42 minutes, Kramnik sacrificed a knight for tactical advantage and played directly against the computer’s strength. Although the vicious attack would have overwhelmed almost any human opponent, “Fritz found a tiny little hole” and defeated Kramnik. Exhausted, he accepted two quick draws for the last two games, leaving the match tied at two victories apiece and putting Kramnik in awe of the computer’s abilities.”It plays like a very strong human. These are ‘human moves,'” Kramnik said at a press conference after the match. And like a human, it seems that Deep Fritz wants another shot at an undisputed victory–both sides look forward to a rematch.Related siteBrains in BahrainChessBaselast_img read more

Buy Stock in Soap?

first_imgA poll that gauges how much Americans know and are concerned about the swine flu outbreak conducted by the Harvard School of Public Health finds that hand washing is up (59% doing it more frequently) and other insights. Meanwhile, Harvard has closed its medical and dental schools because of campus  cases.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Appeals Court Says Stem Cell Funding Can Continue

first_imgAn appeals court today decided to allow federal funding for human embryonic stem cell research to continue while the court considers legal arguments that halted hESC research last month. “Appellants have satisfied the standards required for a stay pending appeal,” reads an order issued by a three-judge panel of the U.S. Appeals Court for the D.C. Circuit. The same panel heard oral arguments in the case yesterday.The stay replaces a temporary pause that had been in place the past 19 days. It will allow National Institutes of Health funding for hESC research to continue while the same court considers the government’s appeal of U.S. District Judge Royce Lamberth’s 23 August preliminary injunction ruling that hESC research is likely illegal. The order also states that the case will be expedited.In the meantime, Lamberth’s court is moving ahead with the underlying case and could rule next month, potentially shutting down hESC research again until the next appeal. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The text of the appeals court’s order follows.O R D E RUpon consideration of the government’s emergency motion to stay preliminary injunction pending appeal and for immediate administrative stay, the opposition thereto, the reply, and the argument by counsel, it isORDERED that the administrative stay entered September 9, 2010, be dissolved.It isFURTHER ORDERED that the motion for stay pending appeal of the preliminary injunction entered on August 23, 2010, be granted. Appellants have satisfied the standards required for a stay pending appeal. See Metro. Area Transit Comm’n v. Holiday Tours, Inc., 559 F.2d 841, 843 (D.C. Cir. 1977); D.C. Circuit Handbook of Practice and Internal Procedures 32-33 (2010). It isFURTHER ORDERED, on the court’s own motion, that consideration of this appeal be expedited. The parties will be notified by separate order of the briefing schedule and oral argument date.See our complete coverage of this issue.last_img read more

Are Nonnative Species Victims of Prejudice?

first_imgMartin Ruane/U.S. Navy Ecologists are battling one another over the value of nonnative species. Last month, Mark Davis and colleagues argued in Nature that experts and laypeople are committing a naturalistic fallacy when it comes to favoring native species over nonnative or invasive species. Just because plants and animals are considered native doesn’t mean they deserve special protection over nonnative species, especially in light of the fact that climate change and other environmental pressures are rapidly reducing many species’ options, argued Davis, a biologist at Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota. Among the examples he gave of bias against nonnatives were bans by the Agriculture Department on introduced honeysuckle, which he said assist bird populations and aid the spreading of native berry-producing plants. The piece has provoked a contentious debate and a petition of 141 scientists who have opposed the piece. Daniel Simberloff, an ecologist at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, writes today on behalf of the signatories that Davis and his colleagues were attacking strawmen in their letter. “[M]ost conservation biologists and ecologists do not oppose non-native species per se — only those targeted by the Convention on Biological Diversity as threatening ‘ecosystems, habitats or species,'” he wrote. “There is no campaign against all [nonnative] introductions.” Davis wrote that biologists and wildlife managers ignore the fact that some nonnative species wind up benefitting their new homes, such as the tamarisk shrubs that were introduced to the American Southwest from Eurasia and Africa and now are the preferred nesting grounds of the endangered southwestern willow flycatcher. “Tamarisks … arguably have a crucial role in the functioning of the human-modified river-bank environment,” Davis wrote. “Yet between 2005 and 2009 alone, the US Congress authorized US$80 million to support ongoing tamarisk control and eradication.” Simberloff counters that biologists do recognize those benefits, but emphasize control over them nonetheless, as some environmental impacts don’t manifest until decades after a species’ introduction. Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*) Military metaphors of waging war against invasive species have “convey[ed] the message that introduced species are the enemies of man and nature,” wrote Davis, adding that such rhetorical tactics drive scientists’ and the public’s distaste for them. But “[b]ias against non-native species is not xenophobic—it has a sound scientific foundation,” writes Andrei Alyokhin, an entomologist at the University of Maine, Orono. Introduced species can decimate local populations, leading to population bottlenecks and undercutting local species’ genetic diversity, he says. And two scientists from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, argue today that invasion ecologists don’t have the luxury of time to wait and see whether species will be harmful because once the species settle in, they’re harder to extirpate. “Invasion ecology is making real progress with defining impact and characterizing risk,” write Julie Lockwood of Rutgers University, Martha Hoopes of Mount Holyoke College, and Michael Marchetti of California State University, Chico. “Let’s not throw up our hands in despair just yet.”last_img read more